xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Rothschild: Political bias ingrained in school culture

Richard Rothschild
Richard Rothschild (KEN KOONS/STAFF PHOTO / Carroll County Times)

The recent uproar related to the posting of Shepard Fairey anti-Trump posters by school faculty has triggered a flurry of local letters, phone calls to commissioners and negative national press coverage.

According to CNN.com, the poster artist said, "We thought (they) were the three groups that had been maybe criticized by Trump and maybe were going to be most, if not necessarily vulnerable in a literal sense, most feeling that their needs would be neglected in a Trump administration."

Advertisement

Most of the people that contacted me were angry that schools were being used by school employees to promote a political agenda.

Suffice it to say, the Board of Education had to slice and dice and juxtapose several complex issues and questions relative to each other:

Advertisement
Advertisement

Were the posters political in nature?

Did CCPS faculty violate school policy by posting them?

Did faculty use outside parties as proxies to incite subsequent political activities by students?

Are students' and faculty's First Amendment protections being adequately respected?

Advertisement

Constituents that complained about the posters emphatically insisted our schools should not be used to promote a "political agenda." Our Board of Education ultimately discerned these posters were political in nature, and required their removal.

I'm not going to weigh-in on the nature of the complex issues this situation presented to the BOE. Instead, I want to use this issue as a springboard to discuss another element of public schools that continues to fly under the radar. Specifically, the question of cultural political bias.

I explained to a constituent, "Unfortunately, it has become increasingly difficult to determine where education ends and politics begins."

I continued, "I'll give you some examples, and you tell me if the activity is 'education' or 'politics.'"

Example 1: When schools assume alleged manmade catastrophic climate change, would you call that education or politics?

Constituent response: liberal politics.

Example 2: When schools teach American history, and students are inculcated with the false perception that our constitution and founding fathers were racist, is that education or politics?

Constituent response: politics.

Example 3: When teachers claim America was founded based on "diversity," but fail to show children the 15 proclamations of our Continental Congress that clearly, and undeniably establish as fact that America was founded on the principles of non-denominational Christianity, is that education or politics?

Constituent response: liberal politics.

Example 4: When schools engage in exercises such as the discredited "privilege walk" that villainized Caucasian children under the auspices of "multicultural education," is that education or politics?

Constituent response: politics.

Example 5: When schools teach homogenized excerpts of religion in sixth and seventh grades, that clearly omit salient components of various ideologies that would cast them in a particularly positive or negative light, is that education or politics?

Constituent response: politics.

Example 6: When liberal school employees make it onto the front page of the newspaper, complaining their county is "not welcoming," while failing to provide a single cogent example to back up the claim, is that education or politics?

As you can see, all of these things point a finger toward a more troublesome and established pattern: American public school culture and curriculum are generally dominated by people with leftist political ideologies that seep into many segments of public education. Ultimately, it creates a climate and curriculum that overwhelmingly inculcates children with liberal political ideology.

What can be done?

For the first time in 30 years, we may have an opportunity to change trajectories. As I have repeatedly said, a school system with a monopoly over tax dollars teaches what government wants. Conversely, a public school system that has to compete with private schools for vouchers or tax dollars will teach what parents want.

President Trump's commitment to increasing school choice, coupled with new Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, may ignite the process of creating competition that will force public schools to start respecting the teaching wishes of parents, and stop acting as factories for the next generation of liberal voters.

In the meantime, get involved. Attend Wednesday evening Board of Education meetings in Westminster and tell officials you expect a balanced school curriculum and culture.

And, one more thing: Isn't "political correctness" political?

Richard Rothschild is a Republican county commissioner representing District 4.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement