xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement

I am writing in response to Michelle Jefferson's Oct. 11 letter. If a lie goes uncorrected, people accept it, so let me be clear that her statement that school board candidate Bob Lord spoke in favor of Common Core at December's board meeting is a lie. Watch the video. He wasn't there. He was on a cruise ship with me, his wife.

I would encourage everyone to accept Jefferson's request and watch the video. Listen to the board members and superintendent explain the law and the history of the Common Core in the school system. Then listen to Jefferson during the public comments and you will learn her overriding concern. It's not the students. It's not the teachers. It's not education. It's the money.

Advertisement

Common core isn't the cause of all of our school system's woes, and getting rid of it won't solve every problem. That is what she and her three amigos would like you to believe. It's false.

Common core does have serious flaws. Too much instructional time is lost to standardized testing. The standards are only for math and ELA, so other subjects like science, social studies, art and music are shorted. Early childhood experts believe the standards for K-2 are developmentally inappropriate. Because of the short implementation, students in upper grades are playing catch-up because they don't have the earlier learning the standards assume.

Advertisement

State law requires students pass four Common Core exams to earn a diploma. If the board was to throw out the standards unilaterally, we could essentially be ensuring our children could not graduate. The Board of Education's job is to educate children. Our state legislators are responsible for changing the law. We must elect delegates and senators who will work to fix or replace Common Core while not risking our children's future.

Bob and I do agree with Jefferson that the board of education race is the most important local race this November. Are we going to hand over our school system to those who don't bother to get involved in the day-to-day issues and promise something that can't be done? Or are we going to trust parents with children in the schools who are active volunteers, recognize the system isn't perfect, but want to improve it rather than scrap it?

My vote will be going for the latter. Please support Lord in November.

Cindy Lord

Westminster

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement