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Add a "mass transit prevention resolution" to the long list of meaningless resolutions coming from our current board of county commissioners.

The board last week introduced the ordinance and is expected to vote on it next week. It says Carroll won't support any mass transit system coming to the county. Given that there are no Carroll mass transit projects in the state's 2035 Maryland Transportation Plan, the resolution has all the appearances of preying on long-standing fears of criminals riding buses to Carroll to rob homes – and presumably hauling their booty back to the city on return buses – while painting us all in a negative light for the absurdity of it all.

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But then, this is the same board that passed an "English-only" ordinance that does nothing to stop state and federal laws concerning immigrants, and their "Second Amendment Protection" ordinance, which essentially is little more than foot-stomping against gun control legislation enacted by the state.

In truth, by all appearances this is merely another example of the board taking a hot-button emotional issue and making it seem like they are doing something when, in fact, they aren't.

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Political types have raised the unfounded fear of criminals coming to Carroll on mass transit for years, each doggedly vowing to fight against any such proposals, even though none have ever been in the works or under consideration. The same is true now.

No mass transit projects are planned for Carroll anywhere in the future. And as we've seen with some of the other transit projects that have gained approval in the state, the time period from first being proposed to approval to allocating necessary state money to completion takes decades. We aren't all going to wake up tomorrow and find a convoy of bulldozers and construction workers laying mass transit tracks in Carroll.

But beyond the obvious waste of time involved in adopting this meaningless resolution is the fact that, for some things, transporting residents out of the county or back in is a good thing that the board will support. Board member Doug Howard, who proposed this transportation-stopping resolution, has touted his effort to get service for veterans who need care to facilities outside the county. That program has been valuable to veterans who previously found it difficult to get to appointments and get the care they need, but it also illustrates that transit projects that fill a need aren't necessarily evil on their face.

Suspiciously timed just weeks before the election, and given their history of using hot-button emotional issues to their political gain, the fact that the board is considering a resolution to stop something that isn't even under consideration seems like nothing more than a continuation of the dog and pony show we've grown to expect from this board.

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