xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Editorial: Be patient with snow removal

There's a decent chance that, as you're reading this, a few days removed from a blizzard that buried Maryland in an historic amount of snow, that your street still hasn't been plowed. Or at least not to your satisfaction.

After being cooped up inside for several days, only venturing outside to dig out sidewalks and cars, it's understandable that people are itching to get back to their normal routines, which can be impossible if your local roads aren't cleared enough to drive safely, or at all.

Advertisement

We ask that you be patient, and understand that even following a normal snowstorm, it can take a while to get all roads completely cleared, and that what we experienced this past weekend was no typical winter storm.

Jonas set a record at BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport, dropping 29.2 inches of snow, making it the largest in Baltimore history since records began being kept in 1892. There was even more accumulation in Carroll County.

Advertisement
Advertisement

No matter how much advanced warning, it's hard to be prepared for a storm of historic proportions. Expectations for snow removal and clean-up must be reasonable.

Carroll County government's Bureau of Roads Operations alone is responsible for maintaining 973 miles of roads and typically work big to small, clearing main roads first before working on smaller, residential streets. While we know this can be frustrating when some roads have had multiples passes before your street gets one, understand that crews are trying to first open roads that affect the greatest number of vehicles, including emergency responders.

And remember that plow drivers are human too. While most of us have been able to sleep in our own beds and spend time with our families, some plow drivers have been working almost non-stop since storm operations began Friday afternoon. For some, their only breaks have been sleeping in their plows or grabbing a slice of pizza at work while their vehicles are refueled and reloaded with salt. We hope it wouldn't be the case, but we've heard stories of plow drivers getting berated by people upset with the work they doing.

Finally, the biggest challenge with a winter storm of this magnitude is that, eventually, plow operators run out of places to put the snow. When you do get out, you'll likely find that roads may be passable but there are snow piles sitting in the shoulders for several days, if not longer, before it melts. Drivers must adjust accordingly, recognizing some turn lanes may be blocked even on major highways, secondary roads will be more narrow than usual and visibility at intersections may be greatly impeded. Again, this is likely to cause some frustration, but we ask you recognize the reality of the situation.

Advertisement

Road crews and plow drivers are doing their best to get things as close to normal as possible. They haven't forgotten about you or your street, even though it might feel that way sometimes. Be patient and appreciative of the job they're doing.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement