xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Trying to make sense of the Iran nuclear agreement

The big political football right now is the debate concerning the nuclear industry in Iran. The major question is whether the agreement as proposed by President Barack Obama and some members of Congress and supported by some of our allies is sufficient to prevent Iran from developing weapons grade nuclear material. There are TV public service spots with divergent points of view on the matter. Making things even more confusing than just the contents of the proposed agreement is the ad whose sponsors close with the statement that the agreement is "good for Israel and good for America." Even with what little I'm sure of about the proposal, I have questions about whether it is truly good for Israel or the U.S.

I haven't been able to grasp much of what is included in the proposed agreement. A lot of the technical stuff is way beyond my comprehension. Having reliable electrical power might, however, just relieve some of the stresses on the government and allow for some positive negotiations on other matters.

Advertisement

At this point my biggest quandary is about the Iranians' demands that they be the ones to verify that their nuclear plants are not developing weapons. I don't think that self-verification would be a good thing. I believe it was President Ronald Regan who, during the Strategic Arms Limitation Talks, stated that we should trust, but trust and verify. This was during the time when the U.S. and the former U.S.S.R. were reducing the number and types of nuclear arms that each would continue to have. The verification for the arms reductions was done by a multi-national set of inspectors which included some American and Soviet members as well as other nations' representatives. That being a consideration, I am of the opinion that there should be a similar team of inspectors included in any agreement with the Iranians. Again, trust, but trust and verify.

There are several Republican and Democratic senators, including our own Sen. Benjamin Cardin, who are keeping their feelings on the agreement to themselves for the time being. These few will probably be the ones to determine the course of this page in our history. Whichever way they vote when the roll is called on this matter could determine the path to some true peace in the Middle East, or not.

Advertisement
Advertisement

On a different note, a warning to citizens, especially seniors like me, to be aware that the phone scammers are back again. I received a pre-recorded call this week from someone claiming to be from the Internal Revenue Service stating that I was subject to prosecution for some transgression. Please remember that the IRS makes all initial contacts by U.S. Mail only. If you get one of these calls, hang up immediately and do not give out any information.

Bill Kennedy writes every other Monday from Taneytown. E-mail him at wlkennedyiii@verizon.net.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement