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Our View: Thumbs up to honoring Homayouni, Food Sunday reopening, following dreams, inn supporting troops | COMMENTARY

THUMBS UP: We’re glad to see the move afoot to honor former South Carroll High School student and boys lacrosse player Noah Homayouni, who lost his life in an unspeakable tragedy in April. The plan is to set up a permanent memorial at the high school stadium for Homayouni, who was shot and killed along with his neighbor by a Gaithersburg man. The group behind the effort has not settled on exactly what will be done. Among the ideas being considered: A commemorative plaque, designating a student section in the bleachers at Parker Field in his honor or perhaps building a wall memorializing former Cavaliers. A Go Fund Me page has been created, and its goal of raising $10,000 to go toward a memorial of some kind is well underway. As of Friday morning, more than $6,200 had been raised. “Whatever they decide to do, I think there will be plenty of money there,” Tim Novotny, South Carroll’s athletic director, told us. “Plus it will kick-start the foundation. I know they want to do a scholarship in Noah’s name, too.”

THUMBS UP: Several members of the community stepped up to help feed their friends and neighbors while Carroll County Food Sunday was closed for more than three months due to the coronavirus pandemic, but it was good to see CCFS reopen in its familiar location on Tuesday. CCFS is a nonprofit organization of volunteers and members of the community coming together as neighbors helping neighbors by supporting Carroll County residents in meeting their emergency and supplemental food needs, according to its website. Precautions are being taken to help protect clients and volunteers from COVID-19. Carroll County Food Sunday at 10 Distillery Drive in Westminster will now be open Tuesday through Thursday each week from 9:30 a.m. to noon and Saturdays from 9 to 11:15 a.m. (but closed on July 4). New procedures have clients lining up outside and served through a doorway rather than coming inside, volunteers wear masks, gloves and aprons when distributing food and the facility was professionally cleaned and sanitized. The Eldersburg location at St. Joseph Catholic Church, 915 Liberty Road reopened on Wednesday, July 1.

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THUMBS UP: We frequently dole out kudos to those following their dreams, particularly to those who’ve had it particularly rough. Danielle “Dani” Buhl, who recently celebrated 10 months of sobriety and is participating in Carroll County Drug Treatment Court, audition for a Canadian TV show called “The Fashion Hero.” The website describes it as a international competition for men and women, regardless of appearance, who want to disrupt the fashion industry. The field of 32 is pared to four to participate in an international brand’s advertising campaign. One will become the spokesperson/influencer of “The Fashion Hero” and travel the world. The 4-foot-9 Buhl, who has a scar on her back from scoliosis surgery, was diagnosed with bipolar disorder and said she previously had been a “suicide mission.” She told us she feels fortunate to have received help in her recovery, including from the drug court program, she recently enrolled at Carroll Community College and she hopes her story and look will land her a spot on “The Fashion Hero.” We wish her good luck.

THUMBS UP: A Carroll County inn recently joined in a movement to help deliver care packages to our troops overseas. Georges on York, a bed and breakfast establishment on 10 York Street owned by Chris and Sharon Tillman featuring five guest rooms, a kitchen, and an art gallery, became involved with an effort called Inn Support of Our Troops, which helps deliver care packages to service members overseas. More than 30 inns across the country are participating, and an assortment of goodies made it out to be delivered July 4. Sharon Tillman baked cookies to go into Georges on York’s care packages, which also included hygiene products and other sundries. “This project was a no-brainer for us. It really was a very simple decision to make,” Tillman said. “When I saw the opportunity to get involved with this particular campaign, really it was just, ‘Tell me what I need to do. … Sign me up and we’ll help out.’”

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