"Creepy Jason" of House of Madness Tattoo Emporium & Odditorium in Hampstead on Tuesday, June 4.
"Creepy Jason" of House of Madness Tattoo Emporium & Odditorium in Hampstead on Tuesday, June 4. (Brian Krista / Carroll County Times)

Thumbs up: His name’s Jason Lynn, but you probably know him as Creepy Jason. The Hampstead tattoo artist with the quirky self-descriptive nickname is making Carroll County proud in a big way. He was revealed this past week as one of the three finalists on the Paramount Network competition show “Ink Master," meaning he gets to compete in the finale, to be aired at 10 p.m. EST Tuesday. He’s facing off against Laura Marie and Dani Ryan, and the stakes are high: a $100,000 prize, an editorial feature in “Inked” magazine and the sweet glory of the title “Ink Master.” Even with so much on the line, he seemed to be chomping at the bit to win the title. In a Facebook Live interview last Tuesday, he made his intentions clear: “I’m probably one of the few people who came here to win,” he said. “There were a lot of people who were just happy to be here, to be given the opportunity to be on ‘Ink Master,' but I am one of the people here to [expletive] win." This does not seem like a man who needs a pep talk, but his fans will still have a chance to gather in support of his title run. If you want to cheer him on from his native county the night of, there will be a watch party at Johanssons, at 4 W. Main St. in Westminster, from 8 p.m. through the show’s broadcast, which starts at 10 p.m. We’ll be cheering him on, too. “Ink Master of Carroll County” has a ring to it.

Thumbs up: Humans can help animals, and animals can help humans. That symbiotic relationship was fully visible at the Canvas in Motion event Happy on Hooves held recently. The Hampstead horse farm has devised this as a fresh new way to help facilitate bonds between the horses they take care of and the people who visit them. The gist is that attendees, after taking a little time to get to know the animals, would begin using non-toxic paint to create colorful designs on the sides of the horses — a sort of living canvas. It’s clear from the people who participated that the exercise worked well for both parties. Annalies Blackford, 17, had previously had a bad experience with a horse while trail riding. Fast-forward, and now she told us she’s forged quite a bong with Marco the horse. “I rode him. Now, I am painting him. He is the one that has helped me get over my fear,” she told us. And Marco, a rescue horse, got a good deal as well: Once the painting began, he soon dropped his head, his eyes became heavy and he slipped into a peaceful doze. It’s a beautiful thing. Happy on Hooves is scheduled to hold the class two more times, on Sept. 22 and Oct. 6. Each session runs from 10 a.m. to 1 pm. For more information on the event, visit the Happy on Hooves website at https://www.happyonhooves.com/.

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Thumbs up: The Carroll County Board of Education is opening itself up for public feedback, a practice we will always encourage and welcome. The board will hear community feedback on the budgets for upcoming construction and renovation projects at a public hearing Tuesday at 7 p.m., at 125 N. Court St. in Westminster. The documents under review are the proposed fiscal year 2021 Capital Budget and the FY22-FY26 Capital Improvement Program (CIP) budget request. That might sound boring, but this is something you really ought to care about, especially if you’re a Carroll County Public Schools parent. We’re talking about school construction, renovations, additions, etc. Simply put, if there are projects along those lines that you think ought to be funded, this is your chance to speak your mind.

Thumbs up: Sykesville will soon have a new town manager. Joe Cosentini, originally from West Virginia, where he began his career in government, is coming here from Tennessee. In both places he racked up years of experience with small towns similar to Sykesville. “Both the towns that I’ve managed have been relatively small towns, under 10,000 in population, going through growth spurts, handling master plan revisions and rewrites; those are all things that I’ve had experience with,” he told us. “All these things are items that Sykesville is going to be dealing with or at least wants to keep doing.” He appears to have a firm grasp of what the job takes, though this is all just first impressions. He’s already saying the right things, calling the town a “gem.” It makes for a nice entrance, but we’ll see if he can provide what Sykesville needs, even when the going gets more tough. We wish him luck and hope he can have a long, fruitful stint in the position.

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