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Sprinkle: Problem with pro-choice is only one gets to choose

Following my last column (“Adding asterisks…” Feb. 15), I received an email from a reader who took umbrage with my political position. Through our email conversations, however, we managed to avoid the shotgun approach and narrow the topic to abortion.

To be fair, the reader raised a number of pro-choice talking points that clearly need to be addressed by those of us who adhere to the belief that in a society founded on Judeo-Christian principles, all human life is sacred and deserves protection.

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That’s the subject of this column.

A number of years ago, I lost a close friend. One of the contributing factors in the depression that eventually claimed her life was the abortion she chose to have years before I knew her. What followed was a despondency that neither her physician nor her pastor could penetrate.

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Let me be clear at the outset: My intent is not to judge the women who have chosen the abortion path. No doubt, many of them anguished over their decision; they were afraid or perhaps felt they had no place to turn.

But I fear for them because I’ve seen firsthand what can happen, even years later when one least expects — when the past revisits with a vengeance. Numerous stories of regret are posted on the internet.

Relying on the myth that “it’s just a blob of cells,” many in our culture have convinced themselves it’s a woman’s right to abort a child for any reason; it’s her body, and she may do with it what she pleases.

The blob-of-cells theory may have had some credibility 50 or more years ago, but today’s medical technology brings down that theory with a thud.

The National Institutes of Health now confirms that an unborn baby’s heart begins to beat 21-22 days following conception, and with the advent of 4-D scans, fetal activity in the womb can be closely observed. We now know that the unborn infant is a separate human being with a separate and distinct DNA. That fact alone brings us to the real moral dilemma: Is the life of one human being superior to that of another? Does a tiny infant have no rights solely because of his temporary residence in utero?

Consider another pro-choice point: Sometimes a woman needs to choose between abortion and giving the children she already has a better life. Following that macabre “logic” to its absurd far end: If you have two or more children, choose your favorite, and extinguish the others; the survivor will have a better life because he needn’t share his parents’ love and finances. The sad truth? No matter how long his heart has been beating, born or unborn, a child is a child.

Under current law in some states, many of the Shriners Hospital children could have been given a death sentence at any time up to and post-birth because their tiny bodies lacked “perfection.” But the moms who excluded that option are the “super-moms,” those who care for their children each day because they understand that while their little ones are not what we mere mortals call “perfect,” they are precious nonetheless.

Legislating abortion is unlike legislating alcohol, drugs, or prostitution. People can and do recover from those lifestyles. But abortion is final. There’s no going back; there’s no reversing the decision.

In every abortion, two humans are involved. For one, the future is uncertain; for the other, the outcome is always fatal — and gruesome. Let’s hope we haven’t reached the point where (to put a twist on an Orwellian classic), “All humans are equal, but some humans are more equal than others.”

The only winner is the abortion huckster who makes his living preying on vulnerable women facing unplanned pregnancies while at the same time capitalizing on the slicing and dicing of tiny corpses to sell to the highest bidder.

I invite you to visit the website www.liveaction.org and and be certain to view the videos in their entirety. Then tell me, are you sure you want unfettered abortion to be the law of a civilized society?

M.K. Sprinkle writes from Hampstead. Her column appears every other Saturday. Email her at sprinklemk@comcast.net.

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