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Roemer: Keep school curriculum decisions local because left won’t be satisfied with indoctrinating college students | COMMUNITY COMMENTARY

In an interview with “The Root”, newly elected Congressman Jamaal Bowman commented, “I believe our current system of capitalism is slavery by another name. We’ve moved from physical chattel enslavement and physical racial segregation to a plantation economic system.”

How am I suppose to react to a statement like this from a member of Congress? With nonchalance?

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Bowman’s beliefs find their origin in dogma that’s been taught at colleges and universities for years. The political left assumed control of college faculties long ago and has worked diligently ever since to root out those who refuse to conform to the established orthodoxy. Today’s colleges are teeming with zealous pedagogues devoted to perpetuating their own kind by creating an impermeable barrier to any idea that has not been sanctioned by the campus ruling elite. These educators were themselves carefully programmed by prior generations of enlightened thinkers.

Millions of parents can attest to the metamorphosis their children experience while in college. With a nod to the Cultural Revolution, and not unlike the reeducation camps they emulate, colleges and universities are supremely effective at rewiring student thinking to produce the next generation of liberal apostles. The faithful have now reached sufficient numbers to seize control of one of our two major political parties, thus completing the process Abe Lincoln described when he said, “The philosophy of the school room in one generation will be the philosophy of government in the next.”

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The extent to which this process is unfolding in public schools is pretty much a function of the communities in which those schools operate. Curricular decisions are still pretty local, but my guess is, they won’t be for long. With its work now complete on college campuses, the left is shifting its attention to K-12 education.

In the coming months, look for Biden’s Office for Civil Rights and Department of Education to begin flexing their bureaucratic muscles.

When they do, our commissioners will need the courage to tell Washington to keep its money — and its ideas about our school curricula. Our local school officials will require the gumption to tell MSDE they appreciate its suggestions, but we’ll be making our own curricular decisions based on what we believe is in the best interest of Carroll County’s children.

Carroll County Public Schools is also going to have to stand firm when the OCC presses it to adopt policies it knows the community will find objectionable. If you hear CCPS is establishing “committees and focus groups,” you’ll know the school system has every intention of complying with directives, called “guidance letters,” and is just looking for cover.

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Students need to be exposed to a wide range of perspectives. There are many ways to teach the same material and it is inevitable an educator’s life history, background and personal experience will influence how lessons are presented in the classroom. That cultural richness is exactly what our students need — and what our schools are lacking. Looking at the same set of facts from various perspectives is a good thing. Diversity of thought is a good thing. In fact, it’s one of the hallmarks of a quality education, and why I am so passionate about the never ending, yet fruitless efforts of CCPS to diversify its faculty.

But there’s a world of difference between exposing students to a wide range of perspectives and demanding they accept the view any particular school, school system, teacher, or federal agency determines to be the correct one. That’s the line we all need to guard against, left or right. Unfortunately, it’s that line our universities crossed years ago.

The CCPS curriculum should be determined by the people of Carroll County through their elected Board of Education, not by unelected federal and state bureaucrats. Likewise, CCPS policies should represent the views of the community it serves, not decided by the lawyers at OCR.

If this community is serious about protecting our school-aged children from the same type of indoctrination that’s been practiced at our universities for years, it’s citizens and elected officials are going to have to act resolutely to prevent it from happening.

The county should set aside money to fund the legal challenges which are likely to be necessary to thwart the efforts of those who are no longer content to wait for students to arrive on a college campus to begin the process of reshaping their minds. Should they have their way, the minds of future college freshman won’t need to be reshaped. All students will leave high school having been plied with sufficient Kool-Aid to ensure they are faithful adherents of the new state religion, and fully equipped and motivated to pass along that faith to the generations that follow.

Chris Roemer is a former banker and a former Carroll County Public Schools middle school principal who writes from Finksburg. Reach him at chrisroemer1960@gmail.com.

For any member of the community who would like to submit a guest community voices column for publication consideration, it should be approximately 700 words and sent to bob.blubaugh@carrollcountytimes.com.

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