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Letters: Perhaps CRT needs to be included in curriculum; Whatever the CRT outcome, it’s a necessary debate | READER COMMENTARY

Perhaps CRT needs to be included in curriculum

I am not a white supremacist. I am not a racist, nor a bigot. I believe in equality for all. I believe that supporting human rights for every human being on the planet is the only way that we as humans can come together to create a better and healthier future for generations to come. That said, I would like briefly to share an experience with you.

I was seated in the driver’s seat of my parked car waiting for my wife when blaring music announced the car pulling into the parking place to my left. I was listening to a violin performance of Pachebel Canon in C,  a favorite of mine since I heard this sweet music as I was walking through the subway in Paris some years back. It was obvious to me that the music blasting out of the open window next to me was enjoyed by the driver, never mind that I did not like the lyrics.

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I grumbled to myself. I can glare at the driver. I can smile. I can ignore the driver and the blasting music. I can implore the driver to turn down the volume. Or I can back out of my parking place and find a quiet space or just simply enjoy the canon later.

Looking back, I can see that any of the choices that I had could be seen by the driver as racist. Even that I am thinking about this now makes me wonder, after participating in civil rights marches since college. Is a part of my thinking and heart in this instance still filled with implicit racism? I think so. Perhaps the other driver as well.

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What course of action I chose is not important.

What is important is that, in my mind, as someone who considers himself to be nonracist and who supports equality for all, no matter what race, religion, non-religion, country of origin, age, sex, sexual orientation, my emotions made me very conscious of the differences between the driver and  myself, and I had lost touch with our common humanity.

So why am I not racism-free? Perhaps it can be explained by critical race theory which teaches us to be aware of how we grow up with implicit bias. For this reason, perhaps we should configure CRT into our K-12 Carroll County Public School classrooms.

And, oh, yeah, encourage all qualified educators, no matter what their differences may be, to apply to teach, beginning in kindergarten, in Carroll County Public Schools.

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John D. Witiak, Union Bridge

Whatever the CRT outcome, it’s a necessary debate

Regarding critical race theory, I’ve been reading articles from both sides of the aisle. Some promote it as a regurgitation of Marxist theory while others see it as a necessary tool that should be implemented in the educational process to try to eradicate racial prejudice.

The social justices firmly see CRT as the next step in reducing what they call systemic racism. However this phrase “systemic racism”, which itself is offensive to many as being racist ideology, is being politically weaponized by both sides of the argument. Should we trust the academics to regulate what gets taught?  Educators might sympathize with academicians but they must also be responsible to the public for their lesson plans.

CRT certainly needs to be vetted in not only in the court of public opinion but also in the public legislatures. And certain jurisdictions may be more inclined to pursue it than others. Is CRT more important than other subjects? Should children be instructed on facts or should they be taught how others “feel”. If the result is that the kids don’t care, what then? Do we force them? Are we talking re-education? For what purpose? What’s the end game?

Our children already seem more interested in looking at their phones than learning. What knowledge is needed to sustain them? Educational excellence in the core subjects is definitely more important for any child to achieve acceptance in society. Opportunity and ability then become the issue.

One narrative being pushed is that white conservatives do not want the “truth” being told that the white founding fathers set up a racist enterprise, which was not the case. The 1780s continental convention’s main purpose was to establish a sustainable central government including how the states would be represented and how delegates to a central government would be elected. Certain slave owners at that time thought slavery was immoral and that is should be abolished. It is merely another hot button to get folks mobilized to that way of thinking.

Whatever the outcome of this necessary CRT debate, it needs to be recognized that current public opinion is already being altered by equality-led decisions. Like it or not, more societal segments are now represented and we are seeing more racial integration between genders than ever before. It will take time to normalize acceptance. Slow progress to some folks. but they have to recognize progress nonetheless.

John R. Redding, Westminster

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