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Letters: Feeble hate flyers not reflective of community; Make your voice heard in Maryland primary; Appreciative of CCPS efforts

Feeble hate flyers not reflective of community

Earlier this week, I was preparing a piece for the paper about the importance of kindness and empathy during this challenging time. With emotions running high, I wanted to emphasize the need to respect the fears of others when they differ from our own. But then something happened before I sent it. A coward snuck around our community delivering flyers.

I debated whether to address the action. Those who do this type of thing don’t deserve our attention, and neither does their message. But the people and groups their actions targeted do. So, while I’ll address the actions of whoever did this, I will not give their “organization” the benefit of being mentioned.

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There are a few conclusions we can draw when looking at the flyers. The flyers were crudely designed, almost childlike, and lacked sophistication. Their attempt to spread hate and fear were feeble, and our community is strong.

Even during the toughest of times, I can look around and see an overwhelming amount of community and love. Here in Westminster and Carroll County, I see more giving than I have seen anywhere else.  I see businesses help their competitors. I’ve had the very people I’ve battled with over policy and government come through for me when I needed help. Our community is one of inclusion and love.

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It’s a shame it takes only one or two people, who may not even live in our community, to spread hate and fear by canvassing neighborhoods with flyers. We can’t let their tactics work. While the flyers targeted people whose skin color or religious affiliation may be different than our own, their message of hate challenges all of us.  We all must stand together as one community and show them that our love for one another is stronger than the hateful rhetoric they’ve clumsily printed on their childlike flyers.

It’s not enough that we don’t agree with them. It’s not enough that we don’t approve of their words and actions. It’s not even enough for us to be disgusted. Those who are targeted by hateful organizations like this need to see and hear that we stand with them. They need to know that all of us take it just as personally as they do when people come into our community with a message of hate. Show them that the integrity of our community is stronger than the wedge they try to put between us.

It’s more important than ever that we help one another and check in on our neighbors. Let them know who you are and what you’re about.

Joe Dominick

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Westminster

The writer is the mayor of Westminster.

Make your voice heard in Maryland primary

Tuesday, June 2 is Maryland’s primary election day, and eligible voters have a range of options in how they choose to cast their ballots. Many voters have already taken advantage of the opportunity to vote by mail. There is still time to do so.

The U.S. Postal Service has sent mail-in ballots to all eligible Maryland voters. It is simple, safe and free to vote by mail – simply complete the ballot, sign the oath on the outside of the postage-paid envelope and put it back in the mail. All official ballots postmarked by June 2 will be counted.

For those who cannot vote by mail, each Maryland jurisdiction also has a limited number of in-person voting stations that will be open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. on June 2 as well as designated ballot drop-off locations that will remain open until 8 p.m. on June 2. A complete list of in-person and ballot drop-off locations can be found under the “Voting” tab at elections.maryland.gov. On behalf of your local board of elections, I encourage every eligible voter to make his or her voice heard in Maryland’s June 2 primary.

Katherine Berry

Election Director, Carroll County Board of Elections

Appreciative of CCPS efforts

I wanted to thank the Carroll County Public School’s administrators and teachers for their efforts in a situation no one imagined or prepared for. It is obvious to me that our teachers and administrators genuinely care about how students are learning, and how they are adapting to the stresses beyond education: family dynamics, access to technology, mental heath and safety, housing and nutrition. I have found CCPS to be very receptive to making adjustments while listening to input from the community, and problem-solving creatively within the limits of the law.

Now that CCPS has agreed to provide a modified graduation for the senior students, we should remember that the staff is putting themselves, personally, in a vulnerable situation by offering to make contact with hundreds of students and their families. I thank them for that. Unfortunately it is impossible to make everyone happy in this no-win situation. CCPS should be commended for making the very best of an incredibly difficult time.

Christina McGann

Finksburg

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