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Letters: Support for Herbert for Board of Education; Support for Morton in judge race; Why has U.S. been hit so hard by virus?

2020 candidates for the Carroll County Board of Education, from left, Stephanie R. Brooks, Virginia R. Harrison, Marsha B. Herbert, Mary Kowalski and Donna Sivigny.
2020 candidates for the Carroll County Board of Education, from left, Stephanie R. Brooks, Virginia R. Harrison, Marsha B. Herbert, Mary Kowalski and Donna Sivigny. (Courtesy Photo)

Editor’s Note: Primary election mail-in ballots are now being accepted, drop-off boxes are open at the Robert Moton Center, the Westminster Senior Center and the South Carroll Swim Club and two polling places will be open on June 2, though in-person voting is highly discouraged. The Times will publish letters to the editor endorsing candidates (one per writer) through May 26, as space allows.

Support for Herbert for school board

The last two months have been hard. Hard on businesses, health care provides and families. Imagine how hard this pandemic has been on the children of Carroll County. Everything the children knew, loved, and worked so hard for has disappeared or changed. Education as they knew it is gone. Will it be back? What will school look like? How will they learn? When the school buildings reopen, our children and school staff will need support and leadership.

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Marsha Herbert will provide that leadership. As a parent, grandparent and former schoolteacher Marsha knows education. She knows the challenges the students and staff face. As the current vice president of the Carroll County Board of Education she knows the challenges the school system faces. Marsha has been a constant advocate for the children. With every discussion and decision, her first thought is always, how will this action affect the children.

Since joining the school board in 2016, Marsha has been instrumental in getting the county commissioners and school board to work together for the good of all communities. She worked with the Sheriff’s Office to establish the school resource officers’ program. She has advocated for school board transparency, is an active ambassador to schools, speaks up for the needs of the educators, but never forgets that what she is doing is for the children. She has been instrumental in working with our Annapolis delegation to get the money needed to renovate and enlarge the Carroll County Career and Technology Center because she knows the future will demand that our students need to be career ready as well as college ready.

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Marsha’s desire to do what is best for the students has led her to support the need for more special educators, behaviorists, and school psychologists. As we return to our school buildings in new and unknown ways, the citizens of Carroll County need Marsha Herbert’s dedication, commitment, and skilled leadership to guide the school system through a difficult time. A vote for Marsha Hebert is a vote for the future, for the children, for our communities.

Kathryn Henn

Eldersburg

Support for Morton in judge race

For the past 20 years I have worked in and with the criminal justice system in Carroll County. I have worked with and observed many attorneys in my various roles and there are a handful that I feel are outstanding. One of those is Laura Morton.

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My first memory of Laura was when she was the attorney for a Latino male who could not speak English. Laura is bilingual and was able to assist her client in Spanish. This trial was close to a week long and I witnessed Laura’s unwavering attention to detail, composure and competence. After that trial I have interacted in my varied roles with Laura and find her to be tough, fair, but, most of all, human.

She thinks outside the box and is able to view situations from different perspectives. I feel she would be a great asset to Carroll County’s judiciary and the citizens of Carroll County.

Joyce Schaum

Westminster

Why has U.S. been hit so hard by virus?

On the TV, you can get a fairly good picture of how the coronavirus is affecting various countries around the world. Is it surprising that the U.S. has close to one-third of the total number of cases in the world and yet we represent less than 1/20th of the world’s population.

Does any reader of this op-ed page have an explanation? Maybe we shouldn’t have been told in February and March that it will soon pass away.

Wallace Wolff

Westminster

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