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Letters: Announcing write-in Manchester council campaign; give respect and it is usually returned; circus tradition was not acceptable | READER COMMENTARY

Editor’s Note: The Times’ policy is to publish one letter to the editor per writer endorsing candidates, as space allows, up until one week before each municipality’s election. After today, no letters will be published regarding the May 18 Manchester election.

Announcing write-in Manchester council campaign

I am excited to announce that I am running for a seat on the Manchester Town Council as part of a write-in campaign and am asking for your vote on May 18.

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As a Manchester resident, I am committed to focusing on the economic growth of our local businesses and our community, and I will strive to represent the needs and concerns of community members.

Over the last 15 years, I have had the opportunity to serve the community as a youth sports coach with North Carroll Rec Council. With 23 years of experience in the private sector, leading a large customer service organization, I understand the importance of communication and problem solving.

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I feel that these skills and experiences would be asset to our town council.

I appreciate your consideration and am looking forward to the opportunity to serve the residents of Manchester.

Chris Cuneo, Manchester

Give respect and it is usually returned

I must respond to Rick Blatchford’s opinion piece of April 27. Like him, I’m an old white guy and around his age. In 1965 I entered the Maryland State Police academy, and during the course of instructions I was taught that interactions with citizens would be critical on how I would perform my job. I was taught that if you gave respect you would get respect in return by the citizen, and in most cases even the criminal element.

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Unfortunately in many cultures today respect by a law enforcement officer is looked upon as a sign of weakness resulting in an assault on them. This is frequently seen in the news in all our major cities. During my career of 20+ years I’ve always treated people with respect greeting them with “yes sir or yes mam” even when they were verbally abusive to me. In doing this they were not able to bring me down to their level, often upsetting them more.

Like many LEO’s I’ve had complaints about my official actions none of which were ever sustained. In one case early in my career I stopped a man form New Jersey on a traffic violation (speeding / following too close) in which he was very verbal, claiming I was wrong. During our conversation I never lost my composure going into my polite mode, yes siring him frequently. Several weeks later my sergeant advised me the man had made a complaint about getting the ticket and, “he said in ending his letter that the Trooper was ‘obnoxiously polite.’”

Kenrick Cassady, Finksburg

Circus tradition was not acceptable

Regarding the article, “Circus arrival was tradition in rural areas like Carroll County,” ad the impact the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus once had on Carroll County serves as a reminder of the dark side of animal circuses’ history. Ringling went dark, as is Cole Bros. Circus. Kelly Miller Circus and many others have eliminated animal acts. Cites around the country and entire states have imposed strict bans on exotic animal displays.

The days of boxing up animals, beating them until they perform silly tricks, and tearing apart animal families and friends in the name of “entertainment” are coming to an end.

P.T. Barnum himself couldn’t convince today’s public that hauling chained and caged animals around from city to city is still acceptable.

Jennifer O’Connor, Norfolk, Virginia

The author is a senior writer for the PETA Foundation.

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