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Letters: Becker right person for Westminster mayor; Agenda-driven meddling in Westminster election; Delegate, columnist endorse men over women; Free police officers of traffic enforcement | READER COMMENTARY

Editor’s Note: Municipal elections in Carroll County will be held from May 3 through May 18. The Times will publish one letter to the editor per writer endorsing candidates, as space allows, up until one week before that municipality’s election.

Becker right person for Westminster mayor

As a 31-year resident of Westminster, father of three, and Main Street business owner, I have grown to absolutely love our town and the people that push it forward. I have had the pleasure of getting to know mayoral candidate Mona Becker personally and professionally over the last seven years.

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It doesn’t matter if you run into her at the gym, at the farmers market, at Jeanniebird Baking Company or at a Main Street event, Becker is smiling and encouraging. In my experience attending City Council meetings where Becker had served as a council person, she was always inquisitive and stayed open-minded. But when it came time to make a decision, she was quick to act in favor of the city and its people.

Another trait that I find to be extremely valuable as a leader for our community, is her ability to create relationships and connections. She is also extremely transparent about her own strengths and knows when to lean on others when they have more experience or knowledge. She has been a huge proponent for entrepreneurs like myself in our community to bring commerce and life back to Main Street and can be seen at nearly every Main Street event and every weekend farmers market.

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In summary, I think times are changing and it’s important to have someone who keeps a nuanced perspective on our city and its future. I believe Mona Becker is the person for this job.

Greg Brock, Westminster

Agenda-driven meddling in Westminster election

The last several days have seen letters and columns from people who don’t live in Westminster having strong opinions about candidates running in the upcoming City elections. It always makes me wonder when people who live in Hampstead and Taneytown take such an intense interest in the outcome of Westminster City elections.

I mean, don’t get me wrong, it’s flattering that they turn their attention to the conduct of our local government rather than sticking to where they live. It just seems odd. What if they really don’t have our community’s interests at heart, and are only meddling because of some other agenda?

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Robert Wack, Westminster

Delegate, columnist endorse men over women

Of course, Del. Haven Shoemaker and columnist Chris Thomlinson again follow the Carroll County good ol’ boy line and select men over qualified women who are running for local office.

Perhaps that all women are running in Union Bridge for seats on the Town Council is why these two could not bring themselves to support any of the Union Bridge candidates and so chose to ignore the obvious... that from the victory of Kamala Harris as Vice President, Americans have cracked through the shell of prejudice, opened their eyes and are casting their votes based on qualifications, no matter what sex the candidate is.

John D. Witiak, Union Bridge

Free police officers of traffic enforcement

Should traffic enforcement be done by armed police officers? In my opinion, the short answer is no. Police are not essential in ensuring traffic compliance. But of course, you need some kind of traffic enforcement. Technology and regulations could be employed to keep chronic violators in check, as long as they applied to everyone, regardless of race, ethnicity, gender, financial or social status.

Red-light violations and speed-related technology can easily be deployed to catch offenders without bias. Systems and automated license plate readers could be adopted for other violations such as stop sign violations and erratic driving. That would leave officers free to do other work and be less subjected to harsh criticism by social justice advocates and the press.

Harvey Rabinowitz Taneytown

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