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Letters: Democrats ignored framers’ impeachment intent; Why was bribery not mentioned?; Parties should place country first over ideology

Democrats ignored framers’ impeachment intent

Given the rhetoric on both sides of the latest impeachment, I decided to refamiliarize myself with the process by reviewing our Constitution and the framers’ intent. I encourage everyone to learn about impeachment themselves by going through the same process.

The basic question: Was the Constitution and the framers’ intent followed by the House in the latest impeachment? Based on my review, the answer is no.

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The framers realized impeachment could be a very divisive process therefore they made it difficult to implement. The House has the sole power to impeach (essentially indict). The framers envisioned a bipartisan and open process. It was designed to be a thorough and transparent investigation, reviewing relevant evidence and hearing witness testimony. Other rights (like due process) granted under the Constitution were not to be ignored. The Democrats completely ignored everything envisioned by the framers and forged ahead in a partisan secretive manner. In addition, the two articles of impeachment sent to the Senate did not meet the bribery, treason or high crimes and misdemeanors standard as required by the Constitution.

The Speaker of the House withheld the articles in an unconstitutional attempt to force the Senate to do what the House failed to do. The Senate has the sole power to act as jurors in a trial, not perform an impeachment inquiry. The framers envisioned the trial would consist of the House managers presenting their case based solely on their impeachment investigation and the president’s defense team offering their rebuttal.

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In this case, the Democrats were insisting on new witnesses because the House chose not to hear them during their process. It is not the job of the Senate to perform the House’s investigation. Basically, the House managers act as prosecutors and the Senate as a jury. Juries do not investigate. The framers put forth a process that separated these powers for a reason. They saw the need for checks and balances in the impeachment process by empowering each chamber with distinct duties.

The Democrats for all their rhetoric about upholding the Constitution did not follow it or the framers’ intent in their impeachment process. To them, it was all about taking control of Americans’ lives, ignoring the will of American citizens, overturning the 2016 election and influencing the outcome of the 2020 election.

Russell G. Vreeland

Eldersburg, Maryland

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Why was bribery not mentioned?

Webster’s dictionary defines bribery as “the act or practice of giving or taking a bribe” and the definition of a bribe is “money or favor given or promised in order to influence the judgment or the conduct of a person in a position of trust and something that serves to induce or influence.”

It’s difficult to imagine a more appropriate example of bribery than Trump’s offer to hand over $391,000,000 to Ukraine if they would do some “research” on Biden son. It’s sad to think of Trump getting away with this “bribery” under the noses of the Congress and Senate.

Why wasn’t this one of the bases for his Impeachment in the Congress? It happens to be the one offense mentioned specifically in the Constitution as a basis for Impeachment?

Wallace Wolff

Westminster

Parties should place country first over ideology

I am 84 years old, the vice president of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME), Retiree Chapter 1 of Maryland.

Will the US House and Senate get back to making laws for the country and not parties’ ideology? I can remember when a law was passed with a handshake between the leaders of both parties.

But now it seems like it is party ideology first and not the country. I hope we can get back to country-first to move us forward.

Bill Stevens

Keymar

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