xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Kennedy: Trump continues false narrative after election that went largely as expected | COMMENTARY

Well, like four years ago, it’s all over but the complaining. Unlike four years ago, however, when the numbers came in the loser graciously — or not so much — conceded and allowed the county to move on.

This time, the loser and his toadies are continuing to make false accusations in order to challenge the results in several states. From the moment the campaigns started, Trump began sowing the seeds of discontent by openly stating that the only way he would lose this election is if it were fraudulent, crooked, and illegal.

Advertisement

He has kept up this false narrative to this very day even though it is Trump and several Republican governors who put up barriers to make it difficult to, or outright prevent, potential voters from casting their ballots. From the governor of Texas limiting drop boxes to one per county, completely ignoring the county’s population, to the disruption of the US Postal Service that was designed to prevent the mail in ballots from being processed in a timely manner.

Lower courts have ruled in every case brought so far, that there have been no instances of widespread, willful, fraudulent, or illegal activity in and around the vote counting. It’s time for the Donald to put down his tweeter machine, wish Biden well, and ride off into the sunset.

Advertisement

Most of my predictions from last time have, in fact, come to pass. Ineffective Andy Harris has been returned to the House. All of the local candidates who were listed as “nonpartisan,” but were boasting of their support of the local Republican Central Committee, won their races.

To my dismay, Mitch McConnell and Lindsey Graham were returned to the Senate, although two races for seats in that body are necessitating a run-off in Georgia, which could allow for equal representation there. If the Republicans hold on to the majority in the Senate, McConnell will continue to add to the pile of over 100 House passed bills that are sitting on his desk only to be denied consideration by the body as a whole — simply because he can.

My friend and colleague from the other side of the aisle, Rick Blatchford, wrote last week about the Electoral College. His point was that it was needed when the Constitution was written and is still needed today. I tend to agree that a purely popular vote system may not be the best way to elect a president, but the current system is also not the best.

As another colleague, Mitch Edelman, whom I’ve never met, explained in his column on Election Day, as presently constituted, the Electoral College gives greater proportional weight to votes in smaller states than it does to those in more populated ones. As he explained, a person’s vote from a state with 3 electoral votes counts nearly 400 times what a person’s vote in a large state, such as California — with 55 electoral votes — does. A voter in those small states even count as much as three times as much in Maryland with it’s 10 electoral votes.

What is the answer to equalizing this disparity? I don’t know, such answers are way above my pay grade, but someone should be able to come up with a more equitable system.

Congratulations and a hearty “well done” to those who put in the time and effort to work the polls for the election during these troubling times. Remember, the mid-terms are only two years away. Hopefully the pandemic will just be a fading memory by then.

Bill Kennedy writes from Taneytown. His column appears every other Monday. Reach him at wlkennedyiii@verizon.net.

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement