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Our View: Thumbs up to a coaching legacy, a Scout’s honor, and hi-tech vaccine data | COMMENTARY

THUMBS UP: When Becky Martin learned of her stage 4 pancreatic cancer diagnosis in 2018, the longtime McDaniel College women’s basketball coach had her game face and sports mentality prepared and ready to go. “One of the things I’ll say, because of the type of person I am, is I’ve always been a long-odds person,” she told us back then. “I may not win the war, but I plan on winning a lot of battles.” Martin won her share against final foe, after winning 554 against other women’s basketball teams over her 37-year coaching career, before cancer took her life June 8 at age 62. Martin was McDaniel’s coach from 1981 throgh 2018, and took her team to 15 Centennial Conference tournaments. The Green Terror won four conference titles and made six NCAA Division III postseason appearances. Martin, the winningest women’s coach in Centennial history, became the 26th Division III coach in women’s basketball to reach 500 career wins when McDaniel beat Gettysburg in January 2015. And before she became women’s basketball coach in 1981, Martin was a standout athlete at Westminster High and then-Western Maryland College. Martin’s 1,299 points are ninth-best on the Terror’s all-time list — she was the program’s first 1,000-point scorer — and her 17.3 career points per game average is second-highest. She also helped the volleyball team to three Middle Atlantic Conference titles, and won a MAC high jump crown as a graduate student in 1981. “She was the best player that I had the privilege to coach,” Carol Fritz, who won 124 games over 13 seasons as Western Maryland’s women’s basketball coach, told us this week. “She was easy to coach. She listened and did things.” Martin is in the Green Terror Sports Hall of Fame (Class of 2004), and the Carroll County Sports Hall of Fame (Class of 1996).

THUMBS UP: Recent Westminster High School graduate Kayla Kelly of Finksburg put herself in rare company by becoming the first female from Carroll County to earn the title of Eagle Scout, two years after girls were first allowed into Boy Scouts of America. The process of becoming an Eagle Scout is rigorous, as candidates must earn 21 merit badges varying in subject from first-aid to business, assume leadership roles and execute a large community service project, all before turning 18. About 6% of scouts achieve the rank on average. Kelly rose to the challenge and earned close to 150 merit badges total, her favorite being the leather working badge. Her service project was a collection for The Shepherd’s Staff Blessings Closet, which provides free assistance with non-food essentials for household, hygiene, and personal care, helping families, seniors, disabled persons, veterans, working families, single parents, homeless adults and out-of-work individuals. Young women have been participating in scouting for decades through the Boy Scouts of America’s co-ed programs, but the BSA further expanded opportunities in recent years by welcoming girls into Cub Scouts in 2018 and young women into Scouts BSA in 2019. More than 140,000 girls and young women nationwide have joined Cub Scouts or Scouts BSA since.

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THUMBS UP: We’re glad to see Carroll using some savvy tech skills to allow people who have been vaccinated in the county to go digital with their results. The Carroll County Health Department, in collaboration with PinPoint US, LLC, is offering free digital COVID-19 vaccine cards for residents and others who were vaccinated in Carroll. VaccineCheck creates a personalized digital version of a CDC vaccine card after verifying an individual’s COVID-19 vaccine history through Maryland’s statewide immunization registry, according to a health department news release. Residents can also use the service to upload images of their paper CDC vaccine card for safe digital record-keeping accessible through their smartphone or computer. Data uploads and verification of vaccine history are conducted using the HIPAA-compliant PinPoint platform.

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