xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement

Editorial: Thumbs up to '10th Man,' housing partnership, top teachers and empowering women to farm

THUMBS UP: “Take me out to the ballgame, take me out with the crowd,” and then cheer me on as I run out onto the field with the major leaguers and tell them when it’s time to play ball. That’s the scenario that played out for Manchester’s Maryn Schreyer, 10, on Thursday, when officials from the Baltimore Orioles randomly selected her to be the team’s “10th Man” for Opening Day at Camden Yards.

Maryn Schreyer, 10, of Manchester, was chosen at random to be the Baltimore Orioles' "10th Man" prior to Opening Day on Thursday.

“I was eating a hot dog and these people came over to me and they were like, ‘So, how do you feel about going on the field … and saying, ‘play ball?’ ” Maryn told us. “And I was like, ‘Oh, yeah! Sure.’ ” Maryn met Chris Davis, her mom’s favorite player, and the Oriole Bird. She saw Hall of Famer Cal Ripken Jr. She got to walk out behind the wall in center field with the players and watch them trot down an orange carpet toward the infield while 45,469 fans cheered. Then Maryn got her own loud ovation as she darted down the carpet, lined with people holding orange Orioles flags, took a spot alongside the line of players and stood for the national anthem. After the ceremonial first pitch, Maryn shouted “play ball!” into a microphone, signifying the start of another baseball season in Baltimore. Quite a day for the Manchester Elementary student. Oh, and the game wasn’t bad, either. The Orioles won 3-2 on an Adam Jones home run in the 11th inning.

Advertisement

It is estimated that about 30 percent of Carroll County households pay more than 30 percent of their income toward housing, a figure Habitat for Humanity of Carroll County Executive Director Bryan Lyburn attributes to the United Way’s ALICE Report.

THUMBS UP: For the seventh time in the past few years, Habitat for Humanity of Carroll County is making available a home to be purchased with a zero-percent interest mortgage, giving an individual or family that ordinarily might not have been able to purchase a house the ability to do so. This year’s abode is a three-bedroom, 1½-bath, split-foyer duplex in Westminster. As has been said in the past about this project, it is a hand up, not a handout. Those interested must complete an application by May 4. To quality, they must meet income requirements — for example, a family of four must earn less than $54,660 per year but must be able to pay the estimated $2,500 in closing costs and a monthly mortgage which will be around $650 — and must be willing to put in the work to help fix up the place. “We talk about our families as partner families and it really is a partnership,” Habitat for Humanity of Carroll County Executive Director Bryan Lyburn told us. “They put in hours on the job site working alongside our volunteers. … Without any interest and without any profit on the project, it provides an opportunity for home ownership at a fraction of the market price.” Those interested can learn more and apply online at www.cchabitat.org, by calling 410-751-7722 or emailing applications@cchabitat.org.

Carroll County Public Schools announced their eight Outstanding Teacher Awards recipients Wednesday night.

THUMBS UP: On Wednesday, Carroll County Public Schools, in partnership with the Carroll County Chamber of Commerce, named the eight recipients of Outstanding Teacher Awards, recognizing CCPS educators who represent excellence in the teaching profession, according to a news release from the school system. The eight, chosen from more than 450 nominations, were: Michael Golden, physical education teacher at Oklahoma Road Middle School; Brandi Jason, instrumental music teacher at Liberty High School; Kimberly Johnson, media specialist at South Carroll High School; Matt Leibensperger, social studies and English teacher at Winters Mill High School; Gayle Sands, reading specialist at Northwest Middle School; Jennifer Shipley, second-grade teacher at Linton Springs Elementary School; Tina Thomen, English teacher at Manchester Valley High School; and Jacquelyn Williar-Voland, English language arts teacher at North Carroll Middle School. All eight are in the running for Carroll County Teacher of the Year, which will be announced April 26.

Advertisement

The University of Maryland and Delaware Cooperative Extension will host an Annie’s Project workshop Tuesdays, April 3 through May 8 at the Carroll Community College. The six sessions will run from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. and include dinner.

THUMBS UP: The University of Maryland and Delaware Cooperative Extension will host an Annie’s Project workshop Tuesdays, April 3 through May 8, at Carroll Community College. Annie’s Project focuses on the many aspects of farm management and is designed to empower women in overall farm decision making and to build local networks throughout the state. The target audience is women involved in agriculture with a passion for business, agriculture and involvement in the farm operation. Topics for the sessions cover the five areas of risk management — production, marketing, financial, legal risk and human resources. Amanda Krumrine, who, after working her day job, comes home to care for 19 head of beef cattle on her New Windsor farm, is one of 6,137 women farmers in Maryland. She is also an Annie’s Project alum. Krumrine recommended the workshop because “it was a nice way to get a lot of information and it provided a good base on a variety of topics … sharing and hearing other participants experiences was valuable.” For more information, email gsmyers@umd.edu.

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement