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Price: We need to return to when we came together as ‘one nation’ | COMMENTARY

Hate won the day on Nov. 3. I think I can make a solid case that Joe Biden got far more votes because of people’s understandable abject hatred for Donald Trump than their support for Joe Biden. As a result, I have honest trepidation and fears of the impending death of this wonderful country. I’ll explain.

I grew up in a small town of 10,000 just north of the Mason-Dixon Line. We had six stoplights and very few on the side streets. We had two banks, two movie theaters, one hotel, five gas stations, two drug stores, and two auto parts stores side by side (Western Auto and Joe the Motorist’s Friend) that were always busy.

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The town was indeed pretty much segregated, but there was virtually no crime and people got along quite well. It was for all accounts Mayberry RFD.

In those days, young people were taught that America was good, the greatest nation of all, so to speak. Our founders were willing to sacrifice everything they had to liberate themselves from the tyranny of Great Britain. They put together a representative republic via the Constitution that would stand the test of time for over 200 years.

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We were told about slavery in our history classes, but since thousands and thousands of our own citizens died to put an end to it, my peers and I never felt any “white guilt” about it. I can agree with those who say that America romanticized its history for many years. When we played cowboys and Indians as kids, everyone always wanted to be the cowboy. Why, because he was the good guy and the one who lived. Western movies always portrayed the cowboys or soldiers as the heroes and the Indians as villains. There were very few graphic shootings as Roy Rogers or Gene Autry always just shot the gun out of the bad guy’s hand.

When JFK was assassinated in 1963, I believe that the romanticism and infallibility of our country was truly shaken. The trauma that our nation suffered on that day began a negative scenario from which we as a nation have not completely recovered. Kennedy’s death was followed a bit later by the debacle we all know as the Vietnam War. For the first time in my life, I saw young people openly defying America and spewing hate at those who supported our nation and the military.

LBJ put forth the war on poverty which, while well intended, actually made it financially lucrative to produce children out of wedlock. Then Nixon resigned in disgrace and the infallibility of our government took another hit.

Fast-forward to that dreadful day in 2001 and the one positive thing that seemed to come out was that the attack on our country finally unified us. That “one nation” moment sadly was short-lived as the war on Iraq erased most feelings of good will nationwide.

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Now we are faced with a new menace that threatens to result in another civil war; that being those who are convinced we are by the very color of our skin “racist.” Further when I see young white women screaming profanities up in the face of the police, I have to think that they by and large are being taught, in essence, to hate their own country. They seem to be completely oblivious as to the overall goodness of America as a society.

Oh, and the rioting, looting, and murdering are not going to disappear now that one buffoon has beaten the other buffoon in the national election. David Harsanyi, who writes for National Review, and lives in Maryland, just outside of Washington, stated in a recent piece that the 1619 Project will soon be taught in the English and Social Studies portions of high school. So much for civics, I guess.

I fear that the only thing that might bring the people of this country together once more as one is an event so cataclysmic that we will all stand together once more. God willing, hate will subside and we will once again be “one nation.”

Dave Price writes from Sykesville. Email him at knitter44@verizon.net.

For any member of the community who would like to submit a guest community voices column for publication consideration, it should be approximately 700 words and sent to bob.blubaugh@carrollcountytimes.com.

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