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In too deep: Carroll buried in about a foot of snow

Members of McDaniel College's ROTC program and friends enjoy a game of ultimate frisbee as snow falls in Westminster Thursday, March 5, 2015.

Snow ceased falling in Carroll around 5 p.m., but not before dumping nearly a foot in the northern portion of the county.

National Weather Service spotters in Manchester reported 11.8 inches of snow just after 4:30 p.m., a short while before the final flakes fell.

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Nine to 10 inches fell in Westminster and Winfield in the southern part of the county received about 7.6 inches of the white stuff, according to National Weather Service figures.

State Highway Administration crews have done what they can to keep up with the quickly falling snow and the lack of drivers on the road has certainly helped, according to spokeswoman Kellie Boulware.

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"I think a lot of folks heeded the warnings and delayed their travel this morning," she said.

No serious traffic incidents had been reported in Carroll County as of 2:45 p.m.

It typically takes an SHA truck 60 to 90 minutes to complete its assigned route, according to Boulware, and the periods of intense snow Thursday afternoon did not make keeping roads clear easy.

For the drivers who did make it into work Thursday morning, Boulware said interstates coming out of Baltimore are passable but incidents have been occurring throughout the day on I-70 near Mount Airy where steep hills have caused problems for large trucks and small passenger cars alike.

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Troopers from the Maryland State Police Frederick barracks dealt with jackknifing tractor trailers on a stretch of Interstate 70 near Md. 27 which briefly closed the road Thursday, but lanes was clear by midday, according to a spokeswoman.

On main roads, drivers who are using appropriate speeds for conditions appear to be getting by fine, Boulware said.

Several hours of cleanup are ahead of crews once the last flake falls, according to Boulware.

Falling temperatures and slushy snow are expected to make for potential icy conditions so as well as clearing shoulders and widening lanes, crews will have to treat roads to avoid freezing, she said.

Whitt expects temperatures to drop throughout the night and reach a low of 3 degrees at 7 a.m. Friday

"We will have a dry forecast over the next couple of days," said Whitt. "Saturday should be in the mid 30s and Sunday should reach the mid 40s."

National Weather Service meteorologist Heather Sheffield said Carroll County's precipitation changed from rain to snow between 5 and 7 a.m.

For the most part, drivers have stayed off the roads after snow began falling Thursday morning and only one crash requiring hospitalization was reported.

Two vehicles collided near the intersection of Hook Road on Md. 97 Thursday morning with one driver being transported to Carroll Hospital Center, according to a spokesman from the Maryland State Police Westminster Barrack.

A spokesman from the Carroll County Sheriff's Office also reported no serious vehicle collisions Thursday afternoon but said deputies have come across abandoned vehicles which will be towed due to the snow emergency plan being in effect.

"It should be clearing after sunset," said Accuweather meteorologist Mark Paquette. "Tonight will be very cold, averaging about 10 degrees."

Paquette said to expect cold temperatures tomorrow in the low 20s. He said it should be relatively clear with highs in the 40s by Saturday and Sunday.

"There's a likelihood that this will be the last major winter storm this season," said Paquette.

Carroll County Public Schools, Carroll County government and others were closed or delayed as a result of Thursday's weather.

Despite the closures, there were still those who had to make the trek to the workplace for businesses which remained open.

In Westminster, Amanda Juarez was busy cleaning off her car so she could head to work at Best Western. She said, though the weather has been bad this season, it hasn't affected her too much.

"I've been lucky in that I haven't had to work the days of the other snowstorms," Juarez said. "After today, though, I don't want to have to shovel out in the morning again."

For some enjoying a snow day from their 9-to-5 lives, it was four-legged responsibilities that brought them out into the winter weather.

Ayaba Mckell, a sophomore from the Gateway School, was out taking his Pekingese dog Munchie for a walk, with frequent stops to allow the dog a chance to frolic in the snow. Mckell said though Munchie loves the snow, he is starting to get sick of it.

"It's nice that it gives you a day off from school, but they're going to just start taking it from spring break," Mckell said.

Fellow dog-owner Chris Plassman was out shoveling his walk, not because he had anywhere to be that day, but for his 12-year-old dog who doesn't care for the snow. Plassman said he's trying to look at the bright side of the winter weather.

"It's a chance for me to catch up on my housework," Plassman said. "I don't like to say I'm sick of winter; I like to say I'm ready for spring. I'm a glass-half-full kind of guy."

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