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Senior center hosts festive farewell for retiring manager

If you go to the South Carroll Senior and Community Center these days, there will be one less familiar, friendly face that you'll see. Karen Larrimore, the center manager, retired from that job July 16.

To mark such an occasion, the center held a party. About 200 people — Larrimore's family and friends, center members, colleagues and special guests — attended the event, which included a luncheon.

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Three generations of Robert Larrimores — the III, IV and V — were present for the celebration: Karen's husband, Bob; their son, Rob; and their 9-year-old grandson, Robby. They were joined by Amanda Larrimore, Rob's wife and Robby's mother.

Co-workers from the Carroll County Bureau of Aging and Disabilities came to give her their best wishes. County Commissioner Doug Howard presented Larrimore with a proclamation from the county's Board of Commissioners, thanking her for her service.

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Following the fried chicken lunch, two enormous sheet cakes were cut. Karen Larrimore cut the first piece, then Patty Whitson, community services supervisor for the Bureau of Aging and Disabilities, and Pat Larson, the new manager for the South Carroll Senior and Community Center, sliced the cakes.

Larson had about two weeks to work with Larrimore at the center and get a feel for the job. "She's got a long, 15-year history," he said. "She was part of defining the concept to build this new facility," he said, referring to the current center building. "I can't imagine, if there hadn't been time to work together."

After cake and ice cream, it was time for chatting and goodbyes. With a musical background of Paul McCartney tunes sung by Jed Duvall, Larrimore collected hugs and good wishes from the party-goers, taking a break to dance with her husband to "Let It Be."

"Everybody's talking about all kinds of different things we've done — fun we've had," Karen Larrimore said.

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"I'll miss her," said Sue Horak, the assistant center manager. "I've been working with her for six years, and it's just been a joy. We've had a lot of fun together."

Larrimore has plans for her retirement. "We're going to do some traveling," she said. "There's a lot of work to catch up on at home. I scrapbook and I sew."

'Forgotten Corner'

The Sykesville Gate House Museum of History is offering up some local history. At 6 p.m. Wednesday, July 30, Diana Scott, author of "The Forgotten Corner: A History of Oakland Mills," will speak at St. Paul's United Methodist Church, 7538 Main St., Sykesville.

The program is a repeat of Scott's presentation in March. Due to a full house for that presentation, the July event is being offered for those who could not attend the first date.

Scott will discuss the "disappeared" mill town of Oakland Mills, which was flooded in 1951, when the North Branch of the Patapsco River was dammed to create Liberty Reservoir.

The program is free, but preregistration is required, due to space limitations. To register, call the museum at 410-549-5150 or email the museum's curator, Andra Dennett, at adennett@sykesville.net.

Nancy McKenzie covers Berrett, Eldersburg, Flohrville, Gaither, Gist, Johnsville, Louisville, Marriottsville and Sykesville. Contact her at 410-848-2260 or mckenzietimes@comcast.net.

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