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LifeBridge Health Breast Care Centers to host Mammothons

FILE - In this Tuesday, July 31, 2012, file photo, a radiologist compares an image from earlier, 2-D technology mammogram to the new 3-D Digital Breast Tomosynthesis mammography in Wichita Falls, Texas. The technology can detect much smaller cancers earlier. In guidelines published Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2015, the American Cancer Society revised its advice on who should get mammograms and when, recommending annual screenings for women at age 45 instead of 40 and switching to every other year at age 55. The advice is for women at average risk for breast cancer. Doctors generally recommend more intensive screening for higher-risk women. (Torin Halsey/Times Record News via AP)
FILE - In this Tuesday, July 31, 2012, file photo, a radiologist compares an image from earlier, 2-D technology mammogram to the new 3-D Digital Breast Tomosynthesis mammography in Wichita Falls, Texas. The technology can detect much smaller cancers earlier. In guidelines published Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2015, the American Cancer Society revised its advice on who should get mammograms and when, recommending annual screenings for women at age 45 instead of 40 and switching to every other year at age 55. The advice is for women at average risk for breast cancer. Doctors generally recommend more intensive screening for higher-risk women. (Torin Halsey/Times Record News via AP) (Torin Halsey / AP)

Center for Breast Health at Carroll Hospital officials agree that early detection can save lives and they encourage women to have their screening mammograms. Mammothons will be held Monday, Nov.14 at the Center for Breast Health at Carroll Hospital, the Herman & Walter Samuelson Breast Care Center at Northwest Hospital, and the Herman and Walter Samuelson Breast Care Center at Quarry Lake.

According to Carroll Hospital's marketing/public relations specialist Jaime Ridgley, the Mammothon is a one-day breast screening event that aims to reduce some of the obstacles to regular screening by offering extended hours. Participants are encouraged to call 888-601-WELL to make an appointment.

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Ridgley said the Mammothon is for general screening, not diagnostic mammograms.

"If you would like to visit one of our breast care centers to receive a second opinion at another time, we will happily assist you," Ridgley said. "The Herman and Walter Samuelson Breast Care Centers at Quarry Lake and Northwest Hospital, and the Center for Breast Health at Carroll Hospital have radiologists who specialize in breast imaging for more accurate reading as well as the most advanced technologies in the Baltimore area for the evaluation of breast disease."

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Dr. Dona Hobart, medical director at the Center for Breast Health at Carroll Hospital, said the event helps "shine the light that mammograms are accessible and it makes it easy for women who are working."

"It's a great way to focus attention on the need for screening," Hobart said.

Advanced Radiology breast imaging specialist Dr. Amee Patel said breast cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers.

"One in eight women will be diagnosed in the United States," Patel said. "Your risk of breast cancer increases with age. Mammography is our hands-down best way to detect it. With early detection, comes decreased mortality. Most organizations agree that the screening age should be set at 40. We encourage women to have them annually."

Patel said breast cancer can present as a mass, a calcification, or an architectural distortion.

"Breast density manners. In Maryland we are legally required to notify women about their breast density," Patel said. "Studies have shown that women with dense breast tissue have a higher recall rate."

Patel said breast density is composed of glandular fibrous tissue, fat and ductal structures.

"The proportions make up the image and each woman's breast density is different," Patel said.

Patel said women whose sisters or mothers have been diagnosed with breast cancer should start screening 10 years prior to their relatives' age of diagnosis.

"We don't encourage mammography in anyone under 30," Patel said. "In women younger than 30, we start with ultrasound. For women younger than 30 with high risk status or who have a lot of first-degree relatives, we screen with an MRI."

Patel said most cancers can be detected with a 2-D mammogram but 3-D imaging can decrease a patient's call-back rate. Patel said 3-D mammography can be beneficial because it is easier to evaluate dense breast tissue, however it does have a minimally increased radiation dose and identifying certain types of cancer (i.e. calcification) does not improve.

"2-D mammography is what most women are accustomed to," Patel said. "It's passing images from two different angles."

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Patel said 3-D mammograms are wonderful tools but not all insurances cover them.

"3-D mammography is an arch over the breast that creates a 3-D image," Patel said. "The machine determines and creates a 3-D images from the X-rays. You can peel away the layers as opposed to 2-D's static images. The advantage is that the cancer is more easily detected."

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If you go

What: Mammothon

When: Monday, Nov. 14

Where: The Center for Breast Health at Carroll Hospital, the Herman & Walter Samuelson Breast Care Center at Northwest Hospital, and the Herman and Walter Samuelson Breast Care Center at Quarry Lake

For more information, call 888-601-WELL (9355) or visit www.lbhmammothon.com

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