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Sentencing again delayed for former Taneytown police chief, who pleaded guilty to federal gun charge

The sentencing of former Taneytown police Chief William Tyler has been delayed again, this time until January.
The sentencing of former Taneytown police Chief William Tyler has been delayed again, this time until January. (Courtesy Photo)

The sentencing of former Taneytown police Chief William Tyler has been delayed again, this time until January.

Tyler pleaded guilty Feb. 12 before U.S. District Judge Ellen L. Hollander to one count of possessing and transferring a machine gun. He faces a maximum sentence of 10 years in federal prison.

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Tyler was first scheduled to be sentenced June 14, but the date was pushed back to Sept. 6. On Aug. 15, Hollander signed an order moving the sentencing to Jan. 14, 2020, online court records show.

The defense requested the postponement, which the government did not oppose, according to an email from Marcy Murphy, spokesperson for the U.S. Attorney’s Office.

“Sentencings in federal court are postponed occasionally to permit the parties to provide further information to a court at a later date than originally scheduled which would be relevant to imposition of sentence,” Tyler’s attorney Robert Biddle wrote in an email Wednesday. “We identified such information in this case and with the government’s consent the court granted the requested postponement.”

Tyler illegally possessed and transferred two .223 caliber, Ruger KAC556 model machine guns. The firearms were purchased for the Taneytown Police Department, and Tyler transferred them to the possession of himself and another Taneytown police officer who has not been charged.

Tyler did not attempt to report the transfers of machine guns or his possession of the machine gun to the National Firearms Act Branch, according to a statement of facts read at the plea hearing.

Federal agents located one of the firearms at his residence during a search and seizure. Tyler initially lied to federal agents and told them he had never fired the machine gun found at his residence and that he didn’t know it was an automatic rifle, according to the statement of facts, which was prepared by the U.S. Attorney’s Office.

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