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Taneytown man charged in Pennsylvania with giving drugs to man who fatally overdosed

A Taneytown man faces charges in Adams County, Pennsylvania, for allegedly delivering drugs that resulted in a man’s fatal overdose, according to charging documents.

Bradly M. Bowman, 29, of the 3600 block of Sells Mill Road, was charged with three felony counts: drug delivery resulting in death, criminal use of a communication facility (Facebook Messenger), and delivering heroin, a controlled substance, according to charging documents. He also faces three misdemeanor counts: possessing a controlled substance, possessing drug paraphernalia, and delivering drug paraphernalia. Bowman was confined to the Adams County prison July 21 in lieu of $50,000 bail, court records showed Wednesday evening.

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The victim, Michael Alan Snyder, was found unresponsive May 31 in the bathroom of a residence in the 100 block of Hanover St. in New Oxford Borough, Pennsylvania, according to charging documents. Lifesaving procedures were unsuccessful, a detective from the Adams County District Attorney’s Office wrote. An obituary in the Gettysburg Times identifies him as a 32-year-old Littlestown resident.

A July 16 forensic report revealed Snyder’s cause of death to be “mixed drug toxicity,” which included fentanyl, charging documents state. Fentanyl is an opioid that is 50 to 100 times stronger than morphine, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Authorities found a fresh needle mark on the inside of Snyder’s elbow, and in his pockets discovered two syringes and a translucent, white container with a powdered substance, charging documents read. A tourniquet was between Snyder’s legs, the detective wrote.

Snyder’s cellphone revealed Facebook messages between him and a profile named for Brad Bowman, charging documents state. The messages, dated May 30, suggested Bowman and Snyder planned to meet at a gas station on Baltimore Pike (Route 97) near Gettysburg, according to charging documents. The last messages came in at 2:06 p.m., stating that Snyder was at the gas station and Bowman was five minutes away, charging documents read.

Surveillance footage from the gas station captured Snyder arriving in his vehicle at 2:03 p.m., a Cadillac sedan arriving about 12 minutes later, Snyder getting into the Cadillac for about one minute, then Snyder getting back in his vehicle before the Cadillac left, the detective wrote. The camera captured the license plate of the Cadillac, which was registered to Bowman, who also has a McSherrystown, Pennsylvania address, according to charging documents.

Afterward, Snyder went home and then drove to New Oxford, arriving at the Hanover Street address at about 8:45 p.m., where he remained until his death, charging documents state. At 8:15 p.m., Bowman sent Snyder a message: “‘Was that good?‘” and Bowman said he thought there was “‘fetty'” (fentanyl) “in there,” charging documents read. Bowman replied indicating he did not use the “whole can,” the detective wrote.

The detective served a search warrant June 19 to seize Bowman’s phone, which showed the same Facebook profile used to contact Snyder, according to charging documents. On June 20 the detective interviewed Bowman, and he initially denied meeting with Snyder on May 30 or seeing him recently, and denied seeing Snyder’s car, charging documents state. Confronted with the Facebook messages between him and Snyder, Bowman then said police might find his DNA on the syringes found with Snyder, charging documents read. Bowman changed his statement and said he did meet with Snyder on May 30, but to check out his car, the detective wrote.

Surveillance footage showed Snyder getting into Bowman’s vehicle but did not depict Bowman exiting to look at Snyder’s car, according to charging documents.

After getting further access to Snyder’s Facebook profile, the detective found messages dated May 29 and 30 that indicated Snyder wanted to buy something from Bowman, charging documents read. The two discussed prices and referred to the object Snyder wanted as a “bro” and “trashcan,” charging documents state.

Snyder was assigned a public defender. A message left after business hours for Snyder’s attorney was not immediately returned Wednesday evening. Bowman has a preliminary hearing scheduled for Aug. 5 in Magisterial District Court in Mount Joy Township, Pennsylvania.

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