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Khalil S. Shaheed, 26, of Baltimore, was charged with two misdemeanor counts of possession of a controlled dangerous substance other than marijuana, and two felony counts of possession with intent to distribute narcotics.
Khalil S. Shaheed, 26, of Baltimore, was charged with two misdemeanor counts of possession of a controlled dangerous substance other than marijuana, and two felony counts of possession with intent to distribute narcotics. (Carroll County Sheriffs Office / HANDOUT)

A Baltimore man who was recently arrested in Westminster has been indicted by a federal grand jury for allegedly distributing fentanyl that led to a person’s death in Harford County in 2017.

Khalil “T” Sadiq Shaheed, 26, of Baltimore is also charged with one count each of possession with intent to distribute, possession of a firearm by a prohibited person and possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime, according to the indictment filed in the U.S. District Court of Maryland in Baltimore.

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The federal charges stem from an October 2017 fatal overdose in Edgewood, Marcia Murphy, a spokeswoman for the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Baltimore, confirmed. Harford County Task Force detectives identified Shaheed as the dealer who allegedly sold the drugs that caused the deadly overdose, according to The Aegis.

Shaheed was arrested Aug. 16 after a traffic stop in Westminster. He is charged with a misdemeanor count of possession of a controlled dangerous substance other than marijuana, and a felony count of possession with intent to distribute narcotics, according to electronic court records. He has a trial date scheduled in Carroll County District Court for Jan. 7.

The following account was given in charging documents: At about 12:47 a.m. on Aug. 16, a Carroll County Sheriff’s Office deputy saw a blue Acura, later found to be driving by Shaheed, driving west on Md. 140 with highly tinted windows. The deputy followed the vehicle and watched it change lanes erratically and, after making a left turn onto Englar Road, was driving between lanes. The deputy pulled the vehicle over and then called for another deputy with a drug sniffing dog. When it arrived, the dog unit alerted to the presence of drugs while scanning the exterior of the vehicle, and it was noted that the dog was not trained to alert to the smell of marijuana.

A search by police of the vehicle turned up four cellphones, according to charging documents, while a search by police of Shaheed himself uncovered a plastic bag containing 29 smaller bags, the smaller bags allegedly containing suspected cocaine. After being read his Miranda rights, Shaheed allegedly told police that he sold “soft” — that is, powdered cocaine — for $5 a baggie and “hard” — or crack cocaine — for $10 a baggie, according to charging documents.

Shaheed was arrested and taken to the Carroll County Detention Center but was released later that day after posting $7,000 bail, according to electronic court records.

In addition to Shaheed’s indictment, a federal grand jury indicted Jacob Leister, age 28, of Glenville, Pennsylvania, on Nov. 19, and he was arrested the following day by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, Anne Arundel County Police and the Carroll County Sheriff’s Office on a four-count federal indictment charging Leister with distribution of and possession with intent to distribute fentanyl and Alprazolam.

Additionally, Earl Joseph Morris III, 42, of Baltimore pleaded guilty on Nov. 19 to the federal charge of possession with intent to distribute 40 grams or more of fentanyl.

According to statistics for the first half of 2019, there are projected to be almost 2,000 fentanyl deaths statewide.

The guilty plea and indictments were announced by Robert K. Hur, U.S. attorney for the District of Maryland; Jesse R. Fong, special agent in charge with the DEA Washington Field Division; Carroll County Sheriff James DeWees; Chief Melissa R. Hyatt of the Baltimore County Police Department; Harford County Sheriff Jeffrey R. Gahler; Anne Arundel County Police Chief Tim Altomare; and Baltimore State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby.

“Fentanyl is 50 to 100 times stronger than morphine and just 2 milligrams of fentanyl can kill you. Law enforcement partners are working together to arrest and prosecute those who peddle deadly fentanyl on our streets and in our neighborhoods,” Hur is quoted as saying in a news release from the U.S. Attorney’s Office. “Drug traffickers are on notice that dealing in fentanyl increases their odds of federal prosecution. We are determined to reduce the number of opioid overdose deaths in Maryland.”

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