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Maryland grants available for Carroll organizations with ideas for combating opioid addiction

The Carroll County Health Department is requesting grant applications from faith-based and other organizations with ideas on how to combat opioid addiction in Maryland.

For the second year, federal funds from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration are being made available through the Maryland Department of Health’s Behavioral Health Administration as State Opioid Response grants. Organizations who reach out to minority and undeserved populations, as well as faith-based community organizations, may apply for up to $250,000 to fund “new and innovative” ideas to address opioid addiction in Carroll.

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The deadline to apply is Nov. 8.

According to Sue Doyle, director of the Bureau of Prevention, Wellness and Recovery in the Carroll County Health Department, the ideas need not be unique in all the world, but they should avoid duplication in Carroll.

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“We are already doing Narcan training, but say they proposed once-a-month Narcan training at a soup kitchen to reach a minority and underserved population," she said, referring to the brand name for the opioid drug antidote naloxone. “We know there are places we are not hitting because of all the little areas in the county.”

Those interested can learn more about the grants online at cchd.maryland.gov/community-services-procurement-grants/, and Doyle suggests people pay attention to the language used in the grant materials when applying.

"Use the verbiage being used in there, ‘to address individuals at risk for opioid misuse and opioid death,’ ” she said. “Don’t say ‘We want to do mental health first aid training to address mental health issues in this county,’ say, ‘We want to do mental health first aid training to help address the underlying issues of opioid misuse.’ ”

In the first round of the state opioid response grants being offered, Doyle said, one application wanted to fund a spaghetti dinner at a church, but that was not related to combating opioid addiction and was not awarded funds.

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Applications will be scored by the county health department and any application that scores 75 or better will be passed on to the state, which will be the final decision maker, according to Doyle.

“We are encouraging as many people to apply as can, because someone may have a great idea we haven’t thought about in a remote community that doesn’t have a lot of access,” she said.

Applications should be sent to both Doyle at sue.doyle@maryland.gov and Cathy Baker at cathy.baker@maryland.gov, and either can be reached by email or at 410-876-4449 for questions about the application process.

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