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Carroll County Times
Carroll County News

Jewish community in Carroll County to celebrate Yom Kippur starting Tuesday night

Yom Kippur, the most solemn and holy day in the Jewish religion, begins at sundown Tuesday and ends at sundown Wednesday. The holiday is observed with a 25-hour fast and special religious services.

Rabbi Sholly Cohen, leader of the Chabad Jewish Center of Carroll County in Sykesville, will hold services this week in observance of the holiday.

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Services will begin Tuesday at 6:30 p.m., at 1332 Londontown Blvd., Suite 205, Sykesville. On Wednesday, services start at 10 a.m. and evening services at 5:30 p.m.

The holiday ends at 7:24 p.m., Wednesday.

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According to tradition, it is on Yom Kippur that God decides each person’s fate, so the Jewish people are encouraged to make amends and ask forgiveness for the sins committed during the past year.

Yom Kippur also concludes the “10 days of repentance,” also known as the High Holidays, that began on Rosh Hashana, the start of the Jewish New Year. Rosh Hashana was observed this year beginning the evening of Sept. 25 through Sept. 27.

Rosh Hashana is marked by the blowing of the shofar in synagogue and begins the 10 days of penitence culminating in Yom Kippur. A shofar is an ancient musical horn typically made of a ram’s horn. The shofar will also be blown in synagogue at the end of Yom Kippur.

Rabbi Sholly Cohen, leader of the Chabad Jewish Center of Carroll County, and his son Mendel, 12, unroll the torah scroll to get to the section that Jews around the world will be reading on Yom Kippur. The solemn Jewish holiday, known as the Day of Atonement, begins Tuesday evening and completes the High Holy Days that begin with the Jewish New Year, Rosh Hashanah.
Rabbi, Sholly Cohen tries out a new shofar given to the Chabad Jewish Center of Carroll County, as he prepares for Yom Kippur, which begins Tuesday evening. Yom Kippur, called the Day of Atonement, marks the end of the High Holy Days that begin with the Jewish New Year, Rosh Hashanah.

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