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Carroll County Cub Scouts gather food for those in need during a fundraising event in 2019.
Carroll County Cub Scouts gather food for those in need during a fundraising event in 2019. (Eldersburg Pack 110/Eldersburg Pack 110)

The Governor’s Office on Service and Volunteerism, the Baltimore Ravens, and M&T Bank recognized Carroll County Boy Scouts and Hampstead’s Little Free Pantry as “Honor Rows” recipients for providing extraordinary service to their communities, and will reward the children with a trip to a Ravens game, according to a release.

For 20 years, the Honor Rows program has selected youth groups and organizations to recognize them for their service during a Baltimore Ravens home game, the release states. This year, the Baltimore Area Council, Boy Scouts of America districts of Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Carroll, Harford, and Howard counties, and Baltimore City, made the cut.

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“Service projects are a big part of Scouts and always have been,” Boy Scouts of America Carroll County District Executive Andrew Lupus said in an interview Monday.

Lupus said he believes two factors played a part in the scouts’ selection. In 2018, approximately 1,500 scouts in the Carroll district completed 14,000 hours-worth of service projects in the county, according to Lupus. That includes Eagle Scout projects and scouts working through churches, parks, and other community organizations, Lupus said.

Last year, 55 young adults in their district earned Eagle Scout, the highest achievement in Boy Scouts, according to Lupus. The number is “definitely an increase” from the year before, when they had about 44 scouts reach Eagle, Lupus said.

Additionally, scouts last year collected 25,000 pounds of food, most of which went to Carroll County Food Sunday, according to Lupus.

“Scouting is just as strong as it’s ever been. It shows that we have a great group of young leaders that we are working with right now that are going to have a bright future — especially in Carroll County," Lupus said.

The 14 Honor Rows awardees will get tickets to a Ravens home game and be featured on the video board, according to the release. Lupus did not yet know which game the scouts will attend.

“Honor Rows award recipients were selected and approved by a committee consisting of staff from the Baltimore Ravens, M&T Bank, and the Governor’s Office on Service and Volunteerism. The groups were evaluated based on the match of their mission to community needs, the number of people reached, and the measurable impact provided in their application,” the release states.

The Boy Scouts were thrilled to receive this recognition, Lupus said, as it shows their hard work does not go unnoticed.

“It means a lot to us because we are a service-based organization and we’ve always striven to be that as long as scouts has been around," Lupus said.

There are 23 Cub Scout packs and 30 Boy Scout troops in Carroll, including four troops that accept girls — two in Sykesville and two in Westminster, according to Lupus.

Their next big fundraiser will be the annual popcorn sale, which runs through the fall, Lupus said.

Makenzie Greenwood speaks during a dedication ceremony for Hampstead's Little Free Pantry in Hampstead in 2017. Greenwood and the pantry have been twice honored by the Governor's Office in the last two months.
Makenzie Greenwood speaks during a dedication ceremony for Hampstead's Little Free Pantry in Hampstead in 2017. Greenwood and the pantry have been twice honored by the Governor's Office in the last two months. (DYLAN SLAGLE/STAFF PHOTO / Carroll County Times)

Also hand-picked for Honor Rows was Hampstead’s Little Free Pantry, started by Makenzie Greenwood in 2017 when she was 10 years old. The pantry, at St. John’s United Methodist Church on Main Street, follows the philosophy of give a little, take a little. It’s a no intake food pantry, a literal pantry door set into the back of a building, where people can come and go at anytime according to their needs or generosity, the Carroll County Times previously reported.

“It’s fun making people happy and giving them food,” Makenzie told the Carroll County Times last month, “just helping them in general.”

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