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Hampstead dentist remembered for a lifetime of service

George Resh, longtime Hampstead dentist, died at 90 on Friday, July 3.
George Resh, longtime Hampstead dentist, died at 90 on Friday, July 3.

George Resh Jr. is being remembered as an accomplished dentist who was dedicated to his work for more than a half-century in Hampstead.

His son, Jim, said he would often read dental magazines at the beach while on vacation — always studying the profession and retaining the knowledge.

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Resh died at his home at age 90 on Friday, leaving behind a lifetime of faith, passion, and dedication to the Hampstead community.

“People loved him, they just loved him,” Jim Resh said. “He was very well-liked.”

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George Resh, Jr. married Dorothy, his wife of nearly 67 years, in 1953, and served as a captain in the U.S. Army following his graduation from the University of Maryland Dental School in 1955.

Resh began practicing dentistry with his father, George Resh, Sr. in Hampstead in 1957. He continued to practice there until his retirement in 2014 at age 84. He was a member of the American Dental Association, the Maryland State Dental Association and one of the founders of the Carroll County Dental Society as well.

Jim Resh, 65, said his father was one of the first two dentists in Carroll County to receive a Mastership in the Academy of General Dentistry. He also earned a board certification with the International Association of Orthodontics.

“In dentistry, you can branch off into all different kinds of things and get into more detail about it,” Jim Resh said. “His passion was orthodontics. He wasn’t an orthodontist, but he liked orthodontics so much that he got his board certification. … That was a pretty big step for him and he was so proud of that.”

Jim Resh and his brothers, Kevin, 53, and Eric, 49, each followed a similar path and are dentists in the family practice at 1306 N. Main Street in Hampstead. Jim Resh completed his Doctorate of Dental Surgery from the Medical College of Virginia in 1988. Kevin and Eric earned their degrees from the University of Maryland Dental School in 1993 and 2002.

Their sister, Carol Weybright, 63, is a medical technologist.

Jim Resh said he will most miss his father’s sense of humor, his love for people, and his inspiration to continue to learn. Not to mention his tricks.

George Resh, Jr. developed an interest in magic when he was 4 years old and a dental salesman pulled a quarter out of his ear. He inherited an assortment of magic tricks and developed a little routine. Instead of dabbling in sports, music, and other extracurricular activities, he performed magic shows for his fraternity at Randolph-Macon College.

“He had his favorite card trick he kept in his pocket and carried with him all the time,” Jim Resh said. “He must have done it thousands of times for people. It was a little card that says ‘I have promised to brush my teeth,’ and it has cavity germs on it.

“If you sign it, you promise to brush your teeth, so he would have people turn it over and where their signature it, there’s no cavity germs on the little cartoon. He always loved when somebody asked how he did it.”

George Resh, Jr. once attended a magic show hosted by Harry Blackstone, Jr. at the Hippodrome Theatre in Baltimore and got Blackstone to sign an assignment card to a club of which Resh was a member. Decades later, he saw David Copperfield perform live and had him sign the same card.

“He had these two greats from two different generations signing this same card,” Jim Resh said. “They were two of the best magicians.”

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Jim Resh said his father also had a passion for piano and tennis. He took piano lessons from pianist Herb Sell every Saturday for about 20 years from age 68-88. On his days off from work at the practice, he would meet a regular group of friends and play tennis on the courts at then-Western Maryland College.

George Resh, Jr. will be buried at a private ceremony Thursday in Hampstead and a memorial service will be scheduled at a later date.

“I think he was a really practical person,” Jim Resh said. “He was really interested in the practical part of tennis and he liked it so much that he when he eventually built a house in Hampstead, he built a tennis court there, too.

“That’s how interesting he was.”

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