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Carroll County sets new weekly high for COVID-19 cases, passes 4,000 since start of pandemic

It took nearly seven months for Carroll County to reach 2,000 cases of COVID-19. Ten weeks later, that number has more than doubled.

Data reported by the Carroll County Health Department on Monday showed that Carroll eclipsed 4,000 total cases over the weekend, setting a new weekly high in the process.

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There was also one death announced, a 65-over resident at Longview Nursing Home in Manchester. Carroll County has now suffered 171 deaths from COVID-19, 142 of them residents of congregate living facilities and 29 of them members of the wider community.

The health department reported 231 new cases Monday and announced the total for last week as 400, up from the prior week’s record high of 378. Carroll saw 177 new community cases and 54 new congregate living facility cases with Monday’s data. The county has seen 92 confirmed cases this week and Carroll’s case rate per 100,000 in population is up to 38.93.

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Longview had 25 of those new facility cases, 16 residents and nine staff members. Springfield Hospital Center had 16 patients and two staff members, according to the Monday data. Five inmates from Central Maryland Correctional Facility were part of the new case data, along with one Brightview Westminster Ridge resident, one Birch Manor resident, one Birch Manor staffer, one Copper Ridge resident, one Fairhaven resident, one Westminster Healthcare resident, and one resident from a facility with fewer than 10 residents. Ten facilities in Carroll as well as the correctional facility, are listed as sites of active outbreaks on the health department’s website.

Carroll has now seen 4,159 COVID-19 cases. It took about three months to get to 1,000, announced on June 10. It took nearly four more months for Carroll to see its 2,000th case, on Oct. 5. It took only about a month-and-a-half to get to No. 3,000, which was reported on Nov. 23. The next 1,000 cases to be be confirmed took just three weeks.

Carroll’s positivity rate, reported as a seven-day rolling average, climbed to 6.69% through Sunday, the latest data available. Maryland’s positivity rate checked in at 7.46%.

The health department’s latest data showed 179 community members as being released from isolation since Friday, meaning at least 24 hours have passed since recovery (defined as resolution of fever without the use of fever-reducing medications and improvement in respiratory symptoms) and at least 10 days have passed since symptoms first appeared. To date, 3,003 have been declared cured.

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Six community members were hospitalized, according to the latest health department data, bringing the county’s total to 232.

Carroll’s total number of probable cases since the beginning of the pandemic remained steady at 419 with no new probables reported Monday. The probable cases stem from Carroll countians who tested positive using a rapid antigen test, rather than a molecular test like those offered at state-run testing sites. The health department doesn’t consider these results to be confirmed cases.

Of the 3,255 community members who have tested positive in Carroll, 103 are younger than 10 years old; 365 are in the 10-19 range; 619 are 20-29 years old; 440 are 30-39; 454 are 40-49; 638 are 50-59; 382 are 60-69; 172 are 70-79; 72 are 80-89; and 10 are in their 90s. Women have accounted for 1,684 of the positive tests and men for 1,571.

According to health department data, Westminster has seen the most cases with 1,424 across two ZIP codes, followed by Sykesville/Eldersburg with 1,072, Mount Airy with 362, Manchester with 296, Hampstead with 263, Taneytown with 227, Finksburg with 212, New Windsor with 92, Marriottsville with 65, Woodbine with 57, and Keymar and Union Bridge with 39 each. Data is not released in ZIP codes with seven cases or fewer.

Anyone who thinks they or a family member might be showing coronavirus symptoms can call the hotline between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday at 410-876-4848, or contact their doctor. After hours, callers may leave a message or call 211. People with emergencies should continue to call 911.

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