xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Carroll County sees weekly community COVID-19 cases fall, first coronavirus-related death of September

Carroll County saw new community cases of COVID-19 drop for the second week in a row, with the third-fewest weekly cases in the past two months, according to data announced by the health department on Monday afternoon, but the county also saw its first coronavirus-related fatality of September.

A resident of Fairhaven, an elder care facility in Sykesville, has died, according to the Carroll County Health Department, the first Carroll death from COVID-19 reported since Aug. 28. Fifteen Fairhaven residents have now died of COVID-19 during the pandemic.

Advertisement

Two more positive tests were also announced among residents at Fairhaven, which is one of five congregate living facilities in Carroll with an active outbreak, according to the CCHD website. Forty-nine Fairhaven residents and 33 staff members (10 of whom are Carroll residents) have come down with the novel coronavirus.

While cases in congregate living facilities have slowed significantly over the past few months, there have now been 681 cases and 128 deaths in Carroll.

Advertisement

There were 23 positive tests among members of the wider community, apart from living facilities, announced on Monday. Fifteen of those were reported Friday or Saturday, meaning 53 community cases were logged last week. There had been 74 the previous week and 88 the week before that. Since the week beginning July 19, last week’s number was lower than all but the 39 recorded the week beginning Aug. 16 and the 37 the following week.

Additionally, one new probable case was reported, bringing that number to 45. These “probable” cases stem from Carroll countians who tested positive with what’s called an antigen test — rather than a molecular test like those offered at state-run testing sites like the one at the Carroll County Agricultural Center — according to health department spokesperson Maggie Kunz. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention considers such test results as “presumptive laboratory evidence,” Kunz said, so the health department will not consider these results as confirmed cases. The health department began reporting this number to the public on Friday.

McDaniel College reported another COVID-19 case and has now seen 11 positive tests among its campus population, from a total of 1,678 tests administered. The college in Westminster is on “green” alert status. That means, according to the school’s website, that “campus health and safety protocols are working effectively and our community is doing a good job minimizing risk.”

Carroll’s positivity rate, the rate at which tests of county residents return positive reported as a seven-day rolling average, is 1.54% through Sunday, the lowest it has been since Aug. 29. The statewide rate Maryland reports has dropped to 2.75%, its lowest level.

According to health department data, the number of Carroll countians who have been released from isolation after contracting COVID-19 increased by 45 since Friday to 1,096. And the number of community members who have been hospitalized rose by one, to 119.

Of the 1,217 community members to test positive in Carroll, 23 are younger than 10 years old; 147 are in the 10-19 range; 275 are 20-29 years old; 150 are 30-39; 172 are 40-49; 246 are 50-59; 129 are 60-69; 42 are 70-79; 32 are 80-89; and one is in their 90s. Women have accounted for 629 of the positive tests, and men 588.

According to health department data, countywide, Carroll has seen 1,898 total cases. Westminster has the most, with 637 across two ZIP codes, followed by Sykesville/Eldersburg with 503, Mount Airy with 232, Manchester with 139, Hampstead with 90, Finksburg with 88, Taneytown with 66, New Windsor with 40, Marriottsville with 29, Keymar with 28, Woodbine with 22 and Union Bridge with 17. Data is not released in ZIP codes with seven cases or fewer.

Anyone who thinks they or a family member might be showing coronavirus symptoms can call the hotline between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday at 410-876-4848, or contact their doctor. After hours, callers may leave a message or call 211. People with emergencies should continue to call 911.

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement