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Carroll County Times
Carroll County Lifestyles

An Eye for Art: ‘I am going to save the world one crystal at a time.’

Bridgett McGinnis is a local craftsperson from Sykesville. When McGinnis was 4 to 6 years old, she used to take a bucket of water and pour it on dirt to make a mud cake. Then she decorated it with grass. “I love getting my hands dirty,” she said.

McGinnis can draw and paint faces. She is a perfectionist. She also does face painting and balloon art because her father, William McGinnis, is a clown.

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She also does crystal wrapping, which involves wrapping crystals with wire. She makes necklaces with correlating crystals for people who are grieving.

McGinnis got interested in resin 10 years ago when she was not happy with her neighbors. She looked up ways to get them to move and discovered orgonite, a substance made of resin, metals and quartz that some believe can remove negativity. She made some and put it around her yard. “Come to find out, it might have been me who had the problem. My attitude adjusted over the years,” McGinnis said laughing. “I am sure it is because of the orgonite.”

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While some believe in the healing powers of crystals, a Pennsylvania State University professor told the Washington Post last year that science does not back the idea. “I am not aware of any [National Science Foundation]-supported studies into the healing powers of crystals,” said mineral sciences professor Peter Heaney in an 2021 Post article.

But according to McGinnis, “Orgonite is a 50/50 metal resin mix that is used to change orgone energy positive. Orgone energy is comparable to prana or chi. People started infusing crystals because when resin shrinks around the crystal, it enhances its ability to function. I use predominately quartz, which is a mother crystal that can help with healing, direction, mental well-being and more. All crystals have properties that can be amplified in resin.”

McGinnis started making orgonites in different shapes. She joined a resin Facebook group and that is where she found her ideas for molds. McGinnis purchases molds that are made out of silicone.

McGinnis starts with a resin kit that comes in two parts. She mixes two components together to create the final product. It starts in liquid form and then hardens. While it is liquid she adds in crystals and metal shavings. She uses copper, brass, aluminum, stainless steel, iron and more. There needs to be a 50/50 ratio of metal and resin for the orgonite to truly work. The ratio is based on the weight or volume.

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She uses resin dye and mica powder to get various colors. McGinnis makes all kinds of shapes including geometrics such as spheres, pyramids and squares. She also makes animals including cats, unicorns, elephants, lions and hedgehogs. Other popular motifs are dragons and mini dinosaurs.

McGinnis also does custom pieces including a crystal that correlates to your life situation and a color palette that the customer chooses.

She is also making memorial pieces that will include grief-related crystal and a picture of the pet or loved one that will go into the resin.

McGinnis participates in area shows to sell her orgonites. She has participated at the Carroll County Agricultural Center Flea Market. She planned to be at Karmafest in Havre de Grace in June, and Hagerstown Pride festival and the Renaissance Garb and Craft Fair in Crownsville in July. She will also be at the Harvest Fest in Dundalk on Oct. 15.

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“Every time I make an orgonite I feel better,” McGinnis said. “A lot of this was reinspired by the loss of a friend. I started giving crystals and orgonite to everyone who knew him. My motto is ‘I am going to save the world one crystal at a time.’ I give crystals free to people all the time who need healing.”

She can be contacted at bmcginnis152@gmail.com. She also has a new Facebook group called Orgonite Obsession.

Lyndi McNulty is the owner of Gizmo’s Art in Westminster. Her column, An Eye for Art, appears regularly in Life & Times.


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