Alumni have planned a rally in demonstration against the decision to remove posters from classrooms.

Community members — namely Westminster High School alumni — have joined in pushing back against Carroll schools after posters deemed political were removed from classrooms last week.

A Rally for Diversity has been scheduled for 3 p.m. Friday, March 3 at the Board of Education office at 125 N. Court St., according to Malarie Burgess, a 2004 graduate of Westminster High School. Burgess, who lives in Towson, is one of four organizers of the event.

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BOE, Guthrie comment on removal of 'We the People' posters

School system officials said the posters, which they deemed to be anti-President Donald Trump, violated policies that say educators can't take a political stance in the classroom.

This event is in solidarity with Westminster High School students and the demonstration they have planned for March 1, Burgess said. Since the posters were removed, students took to online crowdsourcing to raise more than $5,000 for shirts bearing the banned image. They plan to wear the shirts Wednesday, March 1, in demonstration against the removal of the posters.

"We support where [the students are] coming from, and we think the school made a poor decision," Burgess said.

The posters had "We the People" images showing Latina, Muslim and African-American women in the same red, white and blue schematic of the "Hope" election posters for Barack Obama. Both were designed by Shepard Fairey, who told The Los Angeles Times in January that his imagery was "a pointed reference to people who have felt attacked by President-elect Donald Trump."

Online fundraiser started after posters removed from WHS classrooms

An incident around political posters in Westminster High School classrooms has led to a more than $5,000 GoFundMe campaign.

School system officials said the posters, which they deemed to be anti-President Donald Trump, violated policies that say educators can't take a political stance in the classroom. The Board of Education and superintendent reaffirmed this decision at a work session on Feb. 22.

Organizers of the rally are in the process of getting speakers and other community groups, like PFLAG or the NAACP involved, Burgess said.

It's her hope the community can work to be a little more "open-hearted and open-minded," Burgess said.

Burgess, who grew up in Carroll, said she wasn't surprised by the removal of the posters, but she was "disappointed."

"What I hope is that this [rally] will show, not only [to] the students but the community, that there are a lot of people who want Carroll County to be diverse [and] inclusive," she added.

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