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Rebecca MacLean, of Eldersburg, was one of nearly 60 Widener University students who took part in the national Alternative Spring Break program this semester on university-sponsored service trips to five locations around the United States. MacLean traveled to Richmond, Kentucky. In addition to the national program, Widener also facilitated travel for students who visited Costa Rica, Honduras, and Trinidad and Tobago for service-oriented experiences during spring break. Widener, in Chester, Pennsylvania, has been participating in the national Alternative Spring Break program for nearly two decades, partnering with Habitat for Humanity to serve underdeveloped or low-income areas, or places affected by natural disaster.

The following local residents were recently initiated into The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi, the nation's oldest and most selective collegiate honor society for all academic disciplines: Taylor Bopp, of Westminster, initiated at Lynchburg College; Michael Graessle, of Mount Airy, initiated at Shepherd University; Joshua Hooper, of Westminster, initiated at Shepherd University; Brian Kohr, of Finksburg, initiated at the University of Maryland, Baltimore Campuses chapter; Morgan Nelson, of Mount Airy, initiated at the University of Maryland, Baltimore Campuses chapter; Amanda Rau, of Westminster, initiated at Shepherd University. Only the top 10 percent of seniors and 7.5 percent of juniors are eligible for membership. Graduate students in the top 10 percent of the number of candidates for graduate degrees may also qualify, as do faculty, professional staff and alumni who have achieved scholarly distinction.

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Raleigh Linville, second-year PhD candidate at the Johns Hopkins biomedical engineering department, has been awarded a 2018 National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program. The fellowship supports graduate research training and provides recipients three years of financial support. Linville, a 2012 graduate of Liberty High School and a 2016 graduate of Boston University, is focused on tissue engineering of the human blood-brain barrier. He integrates microvascular tissue engineering techniques and stem cell technology to create models of human brain microvessels. He is collaborating with clinicians to improve drug delivery techniques for treating central nervous system diseases. The highly-competitive program received more than 12,000 applications from across the country. Multiple fellowships are awarded to STEM researchers chosen for their high potential for future academic and professional success.

Samantha Anthony, of Taneytown, received the Jacob and Ethel Langer Endowed Scholarship at Oklahoma State University 's Center for Veterinary Health Sciences. The scholarship is awarded to an out-of-state student in good standing. She also received a Dr. Harvey and Corinne Price Endowed Scholarship for her interest in a rural veterinary practice and food animal medicine; and an Austin and Audrey Weedn Foundation Scholarship in recognition of her leadership skills. Anthony is a member of the class of 2020.

McDaniel College students Grace Gnatowski, of Mount Airy; Jackie Sherwin, of Westminster; and Ethan Brown, of Taneytown, were among those who performed in the May 4 College Band Concert at McDaniel. The band features nearly 50 musicians, including McDaniel students, as well as McDaniel faculty members, band alumni and community musicians, performing everything from classical to pops.

McDaniel College students Ryan Higgins, of Woodbine; Jackie Sherwin, of Westminster; and Ethan Brown, of Taneytown, were among students who performed at the college's Jazz Night on May 3. Jazz Night features classic big band swing, bebop, Latin, Funk, Jazz-rock and classic blues.

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