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Liberty High School’s Anjan Singh a ‘hardworking and dedicated’ student-athlete

Liberty senior Anjan Singh is pictured Monday, June 1, 2020.
Liberty senior Anjan Singh is pictured Monday, June 1, 2020. (Dylan Slagle/Carroll County Times)

Liberty High School’s boys soccer fans serenaded Anjan Singh with a drawn-out chant of his name whenever the Lions goalie kicked the ball back into play during games.

The student body waited for the ball to touch the ground before capping its cheer of “Singh” as loud as it could.

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Singh, a three-year varsity player, made a positive impression on the soccer field. He helped the Lions to the Carroll County Athletic League title as a senior this past fall, and earned Times first-team all-county honors as well.

Singh finished his senior season with a county-best 90.2 save percentage, and helped the Lions finish 11-2-1. He allowed just 10 goals all year, the lowest in the county by a regular goalie.

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“Being a student-athlete had the greatest impact on the friends I was able to make,” Singh said. “Getting to know not just the soccer team, but others in the athletic department allowed me to make more connections and it made me a better student overall because I had to push myself to do better with time management skills … it definitely made me a better student overall.”

Liberty keeper Anjan Singh goes to his knees to corral a loose ball during a boys soccer game against South Carroll at Liberty High School on Tuesday, September 17.
Liberty keeper Anjan Singh goes to his knees to corral a loose ball during a boys soccer game against South Carroll at Liberty High School on Tuesday, September 17. (Brian Krista/Carroll County Times)

His close relationships with his teammates and peers helped him maintain that connection with the soccer program as a whole, he said. Those connections also translated into the classroom.

Singh was the vice president of Liberty’s National Honor Society. He also served as a Carroll County Student Government Association workshop director, and participated in a year-long internship at the National Cancer Institute that was cut short due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Singh said he initially wasn’t eligible to apply for the internship because Liberty was outside of the radius in which the National Cancer Institute admits students to the facility, but he worked hard to earn a spot. This experience was fulfilling for Singh, and he got to work with scientists and other medical professionals as they crafted publications and performed experiments.

It also helped him craft his ideal career path.

“I knew I wanted to major in something related to biological sciences so when I went into this internship, I discovered biomedical engineering,” Singh said. “The idea of developing medical devices and equipment used in different experiments is something I really enjoy because it basically combines the two aspects of science I’m interested in, the physical sciences and engineering and then biology.”

Singh plans to attend Johns Hopkins University this fall.

Liberty senior Anjan Singh is pictured Monday, June 1, 2020.
Liberty senior Anjan Singh is pictured Monday, June 1, 2020. (Dylan Slagle/Carroll County Times)

Singh was one of four Carroll County Public Schools students to be named a National Merit Scholarship semifinalist in November. The program is an academic competition for recognition and scholarships that honors those who show exceptional academic ability and potential for excellence at all levels of education.

He received full National Merit Scholar recognition in March.

“What stands out the most about him is his genuine desire to help other people in everything he does,” said Lauren Latane-Valis, Singh’s NHS advisor. “Whether it’s helping a new player on his sports team or helping other students study in advisory, he genuinely wants to help people all the time.

“It’s very cool to see that translated into his career choice because he will use that to help people on a larger scale.”

Latane-Valis spent at least 30 minutes with Singh per day during his high school career because he was in her advisory period. During that time, she said he help impromptu study sessions with his peers to help them improve their studies.

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“He’s hardworking and dedicated,” Latane-Valis said. “He doesn’t see it as a burden to have to study. It’s genuinely interesting to him and he likes doing that kind of stuff.”

Singh is one of many high school graduates who saw their senior year cut short because of the pandemic, but he is hopeful that his class will reunite before everyone goes their separate ways.

“The best advice I would give [to an incoming freshman] would be to be genuine in terms of how you express yourself throughout high school with the types of extracurriculars you pursue and how you shape yourself academically,” Singh said. “As long as you stay true to your own interests and yourself, that will guide you into the right direction and you’ll end up in the place you want to be.”

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