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'Con Artists' to feature artwork of Carroll Community instructors

Gail Holliday, Pat Scalice and Charles Shaffer look at works displayed in Carroll Community College's "Con Artists" show, which features the work of the college's continuing education faculty, Sunday.
Gail Holliday, Pat Scalice and Charles Shaffer look at works displayed in Carroll Community College's "Con Artists" show, which features the work of the college's continuing education faculty, Sunday. (DYLAN SLAGLE/STAFF PHOTO , Carroll County Times)

After dedicating years to the education of artists both young and old, the diverse artwork of 14 experienced continuing education art instructors of Carroll Community College will adorn the walls of the college's Babylon Great Hall through March 21.

The exhibit, entitled "Con Artists: Original Works by Continuing Education Art Faculty," features more than 40 works that include oil paintings, photography, prints, collages, pastels and more -- a wide range of artistic media to match a variety of artistic personalities.

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"We wanted to have a venue to show the whole college and students what great work our adjunct faculty members are doing," said Mary Anne Marsalek, the college's coordinator of lifelong learning.

The artists displaying their work are all continuing education instructors at Carroll who teach non-credit courses to students of all age groups, the majority being older, nontraditional college students. These artists work both locally and regionally, creating works for their own businesses and in studio and classroom situations.

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"We feel it really is valuable to offer classes to people who have thought all their lives about learning to paint or draw," Marsalek said.

She added that the art classes enrich the students' lives tremendously and help to relieve stress.

"Visitors who enter the great hall will be greeted immediately with a reminder of summer to come," said Maggie Ball, curator of the exhibit, in regards to the first piece on display, an oil painting of a beach by instructor Sarah Abel-Deluca.

The exhibit itself has no set theme, but Ball spoke to its purpose.

"Oftentimes teachers don't get noticed for their personal art -- it's almost always through their skill as an instructor -- but it's really fun to see what a professional art teacher's personal work looks like. We are really proud to have it up there," Ball said. "The art reflects the personality of the artists."

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