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Letter: Democrats fail to compromise

Bonnie Erbe"s opinion piece in Saturday's Carroll County Times was a masterpiece of the "why can't we compromise" school of thought.

In her second paragraph she points to "last year's congressional budget haggling" as the cause of this nation's loss of triple A credit rating. I guess you could call haggling the absolute refusal of Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid to allow the Senate to vote on the House budget bill. In fact, the Senate has not been permitted to vote on a federal budget for three years.

That's not haggling and that's not an attempt to compromise. It is total non-compromise by the Democratic-run Senate.

Erbe, after mentioning haggling, immediately moves to the question of how the tea party could oust Sen. Richard Lugar from this year's recent primary in Indiana. My thought is that all the Republican voters preferred another candidate, and voted for him. That is our system. Lugar's 36 years of service at age 80 do not guarantee him a job if the voters prefer someone else.

She then states, "We are examining issues settled decades ago (to wit, access to birth control.)" I don't know why I have not known that someone was denied access to birth control. I have been aware that I never had to pay taxes which specifically paid for someone else's birth control. I strongly believe we definitely should discuss why people who can afford birth control should not pay for it themselves. Oh, yes, under the new system, birth control is free. Yes, the insurance companies are directed to provide it free. All it takes is higher premiums for everyone, and for self-insurers, regardless of religious belief, to be forced into the destruction of human life. That's not free.

Erbe then quotes a new book which states that, "Republicans have become ideologically extreme, scornful of compromise." Well, according to Newsmax website, 30 House bills are languishing in the Senate without vote. No problem, really. Without vote, there is nothing to compromise on.

So, the Senate Democrats can say the Republican House bills are so extreme they can't be voted on. And, since the Senate doesn't initiate similar bills of its own, their accusations become, in the media, proof of their charge. No bill, no compromise.

The book that Erbe cites calls for more voter participation to correct these problems. When the voters participated in Indiana, she disagreed with their actions. You can't have it both ways. But Erbe's purpose in her writing seems to be, as her article title says,"Voters need to say no to obstructionism." But like some officials in the federal government, she really means "just go along." I don't think I can. How about you?

Richard Buczek

Sykesville

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