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Autumn brings to mind fall poetry

What better way to greet autumn -
"Oh suns and skies and clouds of June,
And flowers of June together,
Ye cannot rival for one hour
October's bright blue weather."
This poem is the first thing that comes to mind when we tear September off the calendar.
Helen Hunt Jackson's "October's Bright Blue Weather," years ago, was a school standard for memorization.
This one, unlike many others, has a first stanza that sticks in memory. It's a mental pop-up each fall.
A Victorian poet - we properly shall call her, Miss, not Ms. Jackson - wrote wonderfully descriptive phrases that create mental pictures of the beauties of fall.
In subsequent stanzas she describes gentians which "roll their fringes tight," chestnuts that fall from "satin burrs," red apples "in piles like jewels shining" and bright leaves which "sink noiseless in the hush of woods."
A native of Amherst, Mass., Miss Jackson wrote prolifically, including a novel. Ralph Waldo Emerson, big-time New England thinker and philosopher, is said to have frequently quoted from her poetry in his numerous addresses. This from all-knowing iPod which can come up with answer on anything.
Can you picture her strolling, with parasol shielding the sun,
the lush avenues of Amherst and admiring the autumn glory?
Surprisingly this woman who obviously appreciated nature's beauty, later gave up such writing. Instead she put her pen to newspaper articles decrying conditions among Native Americans. Various statutes, urged by Miss Jackson and many others, later legislated improvements.
Good works to be sure, but this one poem is her legacy to past generations of school children.
As the month unfolds, leaves will flaunt bright colors, fall flowers will prosper in rich hues and skies will be neon blue.
None will disappoint us.
After all, it's "October's Bright Blue Weather."

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