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Carroll County Times
Carroll County

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Law enforcement agencies across the county and state today will accept unused, expired or otherwise unwanted prescriptions, no questions asked, as part of a national prescription drug take-back initiative. Secure collection boxes are located at the Maryland State Police Westminster barrack, the sheriff's office in Westminster, the Sheriff's Northern Satellite Office and police offices in Westminster, Taneytown, Hampstead, Manchester and Sykesville. The initiative is a safe way to dispose of medications to protect the environment and prevent unauthorized access.

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North Carroll High School was one of two Maryland schools and 48 nationwide to be named recipients of the U.S. Department of Education's 2014 Green Ribbon Schools Award. The winning schools model a comprehensive approach to being green by encompassing facility, wellness and learning into their daily operations, according to U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan in a prepared statement. Federal officials recognized schools that save energy, reduce costs, feature environmentally sustainable learning spaces, protect health, foster wellness and offer environmental education to boost academic achievement and community engagement.

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Westminster resident Tom Crowl is attempting to bring the art of ventriloquism to the 21st century with a course created for the Internet era. Crowl, along with ventriloquists Mark Wade and Ken Groves, has taken the reins of Maher Ventriloquist Studios, originally established in 1934. When Maher Studios Executive Director Clinton Detweiler passed away suddenly in 2013, Crowl said the Detweiler family decided to pass the organization on to Wade, children's entertainer and executive director of the Vent Haven ventriloquist convention. Crowl helped develop the new Maher Interactive Ventriloquism Course, which went live April 21.

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The Baltimore Humane Society in Reisterstown recently launched a Read to the Animals program, in which pre-kindergarten-aged children visited cages of dogs, cats and rabbits to read to them from their handmade books titled "Animals." Studies have shown that reading to animals increases children's reading and comprehension skills. The pets are nonjudgmental, which motivates children to practice reading and helps them gain confidence and become better readers, humane society representatives said. The experience is also a great way to expose children to animals and encourage kindness and caring toward all creatures, organizers said.


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