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Motorcyclists ride across county for charity

Almost 100 motorcyclists and some passengers took to the road Saturday for the third annual Mitchell Ride for Children, a charity event held to support a Carroll County girl and her family.
The riders, many of whom were wearing black leather vests with various badges on them, left the American Legion Sykesville Memorial Post 223 at 11 a.m. for a ride that lasted about five-and-a-half hours. The riders and their passengers paid $20 each to participate, most of which went to support Carmen Chanaud, 7, who lives just north of Manchester.
Carmen, who has cerebral palsy, had a ramp and lift installed in her family's Jeep Commander for her wheelchair, and also received a tricycle, swing set and bathing chair that are adjusted for her needs. The event was organized by Unchained Charities Inc., a nonprofit group and motorcycle club that raises money for children's charities and other causes.
"It's awesome," said Suzanne Webster, a member of the group who rode with her husband. "We are doing good things for good people."
The bikes first stopped at Vanessa's Corner Pub in Taylorsville, then traveled to the Colonial Inn in Upperco, with their last stop being the Woodstock Inn in Woodstock.
At each stop, there was an activity for riders. At the Colonial Inn, a few riders participated in a tattoo contest. The riders showed off their tattoos, and the one that got the most cheers from the other riders won the contest.
At the Woodstock Inn, there was a wet T-shirt contest, which raised about $800 for the charity, said Mike Penn, vice president of Unchained Charities. He said the ride was a success.
"It was beautiful, very organized and very safe," Penn said. "It was a great ride."
JD Kozak, of Havre de Grace, defeated three others to win the Indian leg wrestling contest at Vanessa's Corner Pub, which required him to lay on the floor hip-to-hip with another contestant and lock legs. The first person to flip the other over won the match.
"It was about putting on a little show, and being a little fun and having fun, that's it," Kozak said. "I was undefeated."
When the ride finished, riders and non-riders alike attended an after ride party, where they could get food and drinks and buy merchandise from the charity.
Beth Roemer, a member of the group, wore a black leather vest with a badge on back that said "Unchained Few," the name of the charity's motorcycle club. She also wore a large badge with the charity's logo, which is a skeleton dressed as a pirate with a chain around its neck.
"It's a great feeling knowing you're helping someone that has needs," Roemer said, who rode on the back of her husband's Harley-Davidson.

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