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OWINGS MILLS - Jacoby Jones is done with dancing for now.

At least "until I get in the end zone," as he put it Friday during a brief meeting with the media that centered as much on dancing as it did on football.

It was Jones' first meeting with the media in a news conference-type setting since finishing his third-place run on "Dancing with the Stars."

But, for all of the attention he's gotten as a dancer, Jones described himself Friday as "back in my element" and, at least according to Ravens offensive coordinator Jim Caldwell, is "in great shape" and "has had a good week [of practice]."

Baltimore completed the second of its three three-day voluntary organized team activities (OTAs) Friday. Jones missed the first two days of the Ravens' first voluntary OTA last week as he competed in the finals of "Dancing with the Stars", but he was back for the final practice of that OTA last Thursday and was a participant in each of Baltimore's three OTA practices this week.

"He's obviously working his way back into football shape, but he's in great condition," Caldwell said. "Obviously, it was pretty strenuous with what he was doing, and [he's talked about] what he had to go through in terms of preparation and those things.

"It was pretty challenging ... so it's not just like he is flat out of shape or anything. ... He just obviously has to get [re-accustomed] to catching the ball and those kinds of things."

Jones, 28, is part of a group of wide receivers the Ravens are depending on to help offset the loss of Anquan Boldin.

Jones is considered by most to be the early favorite to replace Boldin in the starting lineup opposite Torrey Smith, although many, despite Jones' speed and big-play potential, feel he's better suited for a situational-type role.

"You all know how I am. I just play my role," Jones said. "Whatever they want me to do, I'm ready to do it. I think the receiving corps as a whole, we've all got to step up and make plays."

Jones has started in the past.

He's never posted more than 562 yards in a season, but he did start 21 games during his five years with the Houston Texans and started three games for the Ravens last season. He had a career-best 51 catches for 562 yards and three touchdowns for the Texans in 2010 and 31 catches for 512 yards and two scores in 2011 during a season that he started 10 games.

He had 30 catches for 406 yards and one touchdown for Baltimore during the regular season last year. He had only five catches in the Ravens' four playoff games, but one was his memorable, game-tying 70-yard touchdown catch during Baltimore's divisional round win over the Denver Broncos and another was his 56-yard catch-and-run for a touchdown during the Super Bowl.

It's no secret, though, that Jones' primary impact last year was as a returner. He had three touchdown returns during the regular season - two kicks and one punt- and he had an NFL postseason-record-tying 108-yard kick return for a touchdown during the Super Bowl.

But Caldwell said Friday that "I think you are going to find obviously that [Jones] is going to get more opportunities [as a receiver this year]."

"I do think that he has the ability [to play a bigger role]," Caldwell said of Jones. "There's no question about that. He has the ability to do it. He can catch. He can run. Obviously, he is still going to serve our special teams and serve them well in his role that he plays for them. But then obviously, we will use him certainly as a big part of our offense as well."

As far as dancing, Jones joked that he has some special moves planned for whenever he does find the end zone next.

"Duh! You think I was doing that dancing for nothing?" Jones joked. "I can't wait to get in the end zone."

But Jones also said that his "Dancing with the Stars" experience could prove beneficial as far as what he does at wide receiver.

"I think it made me more graceful," Jones said. "I can never point my toes because I'm pigeon-toed. ... [But], I mean, it helped me with my foot placement though and it made me more patient, so it did help a lot."

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