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Lincoln goes Hollywood

Very soon, Abraham Lincoln, will go Hollywood.

Under the creative, imaginative direction of Steven Spielberg, "Lincoln" will open soon in theaters across the USA.

Spielberg, whose diverse reputation includes "E.T." and "Schindler's List", commented in a Smithsonian magazine interview, "I did not want to make a movie about an ornament. I wanted the audience to get into the process of the president."

One "process of the president", which Spielberg does not know, is told in a document at the Reisterstown Branch of the Baltimore County Public Library.

The brief document announces the appointment of Dr. Charles Leas, Glyndon's founder, as consul to Madeira.

"Rest of the story" is that the document is signed by Lincoln.

Big question, as yet to be researched by the library, is whether this is a real Lincoln signature or whether it is from a stamp.

Missing from the library quite a while a few years ago, the carefully rolled paper was found by a diligent volunteer.

Now in safekeeping, the authenticity as yet has not been determined.

The interesting statement and signature, is important historically and could be valuable if an actual signature.

The item was one of many gifts to the library from Mrs. Ada Zouck German, native and lifelong Reisterstown resident.

The film "Lincoln" has been 13 years in the making. It started when Doris Kearns Goodwin, author and Lincoln scholar, told Spielberg she was working on a book about Lincoln.

Immediately he offered to reserve the motion picture rights.

Over the years the book, with the original title "Team of Rivals", underwent various aspects between Goodwin and Tony Kushner who wrote the screenplay.

The movie eventually focused on passage of the 13th Amendment which abolished slavery.

At least four times before Lincoln has been a film and television star: portrayed by Walter Huston, Henry Fonda, Raymond Masser and Sam Waterston.

Daniel Day-Lewis takes on the role in the new film.

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