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Machado's HR caps O's rally

BOSTON - The Baltimore Orioles were getting frustrated. After three straight defeats, they were an out away from a fourth straight, but a five-run ninth inning rally propelled them to an exciting 8-5 win over the Boston Red Sox before 30,862 at Fenway Park Wednesday.

With the Orioles trailing 5-3 in the ninth, Chris Davis hit a leadoff home run off Joel Hanrahan (0-1), and then a two-out single by Ryan Flaherty and walks to Nolan Reimold and Nate McLouth loaded the bases.

On the first pitch to Manny Machado, Hanrahan threw a wild pitch to score pinch runner Alexi Casilla. Then Machado hit a three-run home run to left field, breaking his 1-for-18 slump, giving Baltimore (4-4) the 8-5 lead.

"We were really never ahead the whole game and to come out with the victory it is really going to give us the big boost we needed to get this show going," Machado said.

Darren O'Day (1-0) pitched the eighth for the win. Jim Johnson collected his third save with a spotless ninth.

After three one-run losses and one two-run loss, manager Buck Showalter was relieved with the win, but said it wasn't special.

"Nobody in the clubhouse pays attention. An L is an L and a W is a W. You win by three, one, you lose by one, it's as good as 100. It's something people will talk about and I understand it makes for good fodder, but nobody pays attention to it," Showalter said.

Jake Arrieta started and pitched five innings, allowing three runs, but after a 43-minute rain delay, manager Buck Showalter decided to put Tommy Hunter in the game.

Hunter struck out his first two batters, then allowed consecutive home runs to Daniel Nava and Jarrod Saltalamacchia.

It was the first less-than-capacity crowd at Fenway Park after 794 sellouts, a streak that ran just short of a decade.

NOTES: The Orioles traded Luis Ayala to Atlanta for minor league pitcher Chris Jones and purchased outfielder Chris Dickerson's contract from Triple-A Norfolk.

The move was forced by Baltimore wanting to keep Rule 5 draft choice T.J. McFarland on the roster and gives the Orioles 12 pitchers and four bench players.

For three games, the team went with a short bench and 13 pitchers.

Ayala, who is 35, was 5-5 with a 2.64 ERA in 66 games last year, and was 1-0 with a 9.00 ERA in two games this season.

"The trade frees up a spot on our major league roster for T.J. McFarland," Orioles executive vice president of baseball operations Dan Duquette said. "We like McFarland."

The Orioles also like Jones, who is 24-20 with a 3.58 ERA in his seven seasons with the Cleveland and Atlanta organizations.

Chris Jones has good stuff. He made a good move toward the major leagues last season. He saved a couple of big games late in the year. He's on track to be a contributing left-hander in the major leagues," Duquette said.

Showalter said that he was sorry to see Ayala go.

"Luis will like it there. Atlanta is a good spot for him. It's a good club, but we like the player we got back. We like the conventional 12 pitchers and get our bench back at full strength and also creates some opportunities," Showalter said.

Dickerson, who signed a minor league contract just before the start of spring training, was one of the last cuts in spring training. He was told of his promotion just before he batted in the first inning of Tuesday night's Norfolk game.

He was not in the lineup on Wednesday, his 31st birthday, but was used as a pinch-runner for Reimold in the ninth.

"That's what you're playing for. You're constantly competing every day in spring training in hopes of earning that spot. When it came down to that last day, it was crushing, but Buck and I talked about it and he said not to be too down about it because you could be back at any time. And he was right," Dickerson said.

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