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Letter: Germany shouldn't have to pay

The International Monetary Fund recently said Germany's economy is doing well in its recovery, but the country should be more active in helping the rest of the Eurozone cope with the crisis. In other words, it should be paying more into countries that have spent or are committed to spending more money than they could ever take in.

Greece, Spain, Italy and others have promised earlier retirement, higher wages and nice pension plans that we would love to have.

Also, Europe's highest court just recently said that if any European should fall ill during their four- to six-week vacation they enjoy every year, they should still be given that time back with pay. Wow, how nice. But Germany doesn't have it quite so good for its working people; they work harder for less pay in general and have had a strong, growing economy as a result of that work ethic and fiscal restraint.

They live within their means, but are being asked to help more in the name of saving their Euro. This is a country that was devastated by two world wars and, in 1989, received back into its economy its poorer half, East Germany, but it went to work and once again is being told it needs to pay its people more, give them more benefits and, in essence, be reckless and irresponsible like the neighbors they are being asked to subsidize.

No, they should help only if their neighbors start behaving more responsibly and live within their means. It can be painful, but if Germany has to pay more and more, I would venture to say that they lose their incentive if those less productive are enjoying the fruits of the Germans' labor.

Earle Hutchison

Finksburg

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