xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Variety of pancakes overwhelming

If you ate just a plain old pancake yesterday on "Pancake Day," you're out of the loop.

Like many other food items, pancakes have gone contemporary, i.e., there are enough varieties to confuse you.

Some sound easy to make. For others - if you're looking for a fancy breakfast - choose restaurants that specialize in such goodies.

In a list of the hip-style breakfast food, the variety that first caught my chocoholic eye were "mint chocolate chip" pancakes.

Besides sounding mouth-watering, it also sounds easy. Into regular pancake batter, add semi-sweet chocolate chips and a dash of pure mint extract.

Now, there's a winner.

Other varieties on the list include bacon pancakes - just chuck in a handful of crumbled crisp bacon - lemon poppy seed pancakes - lemon juice, zest and poppy seeds give this one its name - and carrot cake pancakes with cream cheese glaze - buy this one.

Not for me are "red velvet" pancakes. Can't imagine that a red pancake would be tempting.

In any gourmet list, there is always a piece de resistance; here the recipe is for "Boston cream pie pancakes." It's described as a pancake layered with rich pastry cream and chocolate.

Delicious? Undoubtedly.

Calories? Hundreds.

Adding maple syrup to these concoctions almost sounds out of place.

But to a regular, everyday pancake, there also is variety in your choice of maple syrup. Both blueberry and orange-honey syrup are easy to make but also can be found in the supermarket syrup aisle.

What's behind all this pancake consumption on the last Tuesday before Ash Wednesday and the start of Lent?

Centuries ago, food restrictions for Lent included fats, milk and eggs. To use up those items, which then would have spoiled during the 40 days of Lent, many families planned large feasts.

English tradition added pancakes to the day, which involved lots of eating: "Fat Tuesday" or Mardi Gras was so named.

Over the top New Orleans Mardi Gras parades, and all out partying, abruptly ends at midnight with the beginning of Lent.

Can you imagine the job battalions of street sweepers tackle as they literally, push the crowds out of the French Quarter toward home?

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement