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The Marlin K. Hoff Memorial Log Barn committee recently received a $2,500 grant to improve educational programs offered at the exhibit. The money will be used to create educational videos that will play on screens inside the barn, located on the grounds of the Carroll County Farm Museum in Westminster. The videos will feature information on farmers' practices during the Colonial period and the 1800s. The grant money may also be used to grow crops such as tobacco, corn and wheat on a plot near the barn that will give it a more authentic look and allow for other programs.

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Colgate's Bright Smiles, Bright Futures mobile dental van visited Elmer Wolfe Elementary School Wednesday to offer 2-minute dental screenings for children. A dental hygienist showed students a video, spoke about healthy eating habits and healthy brushing habits - brushing twice and flossing once daily, as well as sweeping, scrubbing and scooping brushing techniques they should use while brushing their teeth for almost three minutes. Dentists who partnered with Colgate to bring the traveling clinic to Carroll said there are high levels of tooth decay among some youths in the area.

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Many children in the community have gotten teeth extracted, which she blames on multiple factors, including people losing their dental insurance and having busy schedules with no time to visit the dentist.
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Finksburg resident Dani Knight turned a miserable snowstorm earlier this month into something positive, namely a fundraiser for Relay for Life. Through Facebook, Knight made a challenge for people to sign up to donate $2 for every inch of snow that was recorded from the snowstorm in Westminster. Donations would go to Knight's team for the May 16 Westminster Relay for Life event, which raises funds for the American Cancer Society. With 25 inches of snow on the ground, the snow challenge had racked up more than $1,500 in donations to Relay for Life.

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An exhibit called "Target America: Opening Eyes to the Damage Drugs Cause" opened recently at the Maryland Science Center in Baltimore. It features bumper stickers, signs, pamphlets and other material from Carroll County's "Heroin Kills" campaign from the late 1990s. Although it's unfortunate that such a campaign ever needed to be undertaken in our community in the first place, the fact that it had such profound effects across the country and was recognized by the Drug Enforcement Administration speaks volumes about its importance, especially as Carroll is struggling with an increase in opioid-related deaths. The Carroll memorabilia is a small part of the larger exhibit aimed at educating state residents on drug trafficking and how drug usage affects the community at large.

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