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Gerber attended 'Chemistry in Society' summer program

Trent Gerber, a student from Hampstead, attended one of the Johns Hopkins Center for Talented Youth programs for academically gifted second- through 12th-graders this summer.

"Be A Scientist" and "The Ancient World," for second- through sixth-graders, and "Cryptology" and "Principles of Engineering Design," for seventh- through 10th-graders, were just a few of the more than nearly 100 Center for Talented Youth summer program courses available during two three-week sessions.

The program's format makes it possible for bright students to work at an accelerated pace, study topics in depth, and explore subjects that are not usually available to students their age.

By participating in the Center for Talented Youth, students also have the opportunity to forge friendships with students from around the world who share their interests.

Center for Talented Youth summer programs are offered at 25 sites, from Johns Hopkins University in the east to Stanford University in the west.

The center offers two kinds of summer programs. Residential programs, available to students in grades five through 12, provide the opportunity to live on a college campus while studying and socializing with other bright, motivated students. Day programs, open to students in second through sixth grades, give younger students the opportunity to pursue intellectually challenging topics in an active, dynamic setting.

Trent took a Center for Talented Youth summer program called "Chemistry in Society" July 15-Aug. 3 at Lafayette College in Easton, Pa. In this course, students investigated topics in chemistry as a means to solving simulated real-world problems, including water pollution, the toxic properties of pharmaceuticals, and the need for alternative fuels. The course emphasized learning concepts in a laboratory setting to demonstrate how chemistry affects people's everyday lives.

Trent qualified for Center for Talented Youth summer programs by participating in the center's Annual Talent Search, which accepts applications from early September through May. During this search, advanced young learners take above-grade-level tests designed for older students as a means of gaining insight into their abilities. Seventh- and eighth-graders take the SAT or ACT - the same tests used for college admissions, while second- through sixth-graders take the School and College Ability Test, an above-level test scaled for younger students.

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