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Letter: Democrats can compromise too

In his Sept. 29 opinion column, Jim Lee makes some interesting observations regarding the GOP, the tea party and the current deadlock in D.C.
However, I find the statement "...for any group ... to say that they have to have their way 100 percent of the time ... is just plain wrong" is a bit disingenuous. The tea party has its share of faults, but lost in the noise (mostly from the left) over obstructionism is the reason why the tea party came into existence in the first place.
Didn't President Barack Hussain Obama respond to attempts to negotiate by a seriously weakened GOP by boasting "we won," and implying you lost-so shut up, in 2009? Didn't House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Majority Leader Harry Reid shut out GOP input to the legislation process that has given us Obamacare? This attitude gave great momentum to the growth of the tea party, and I find it quite ironic for those leaning left to complain about perceived obstructionism now.
Keep in mind, the latest proposal from the GOP-controlled House of Representatives only delays implementation of Obamacare for one year. This is reasonable, and something that Obama himself has already done regarding certain parts of this law.
It is also interesting that a Rasmussen poll was cited to show declining support for the tea party. The poll was taken in last January, before the IRS scandal. How relevant that poll is now is a matter for conjecture. One can assume that the tea party caused enough fear in certain government circles to provoke the overly zealous scrutiny that supporters received from the IRS.
Perhaps the GOP does need to break from extremes, but then again, a new Democratic Party may want to consider a new spirit of cooperation and compromise. My way or the highway sounds good in movies, but can do great harm in a democracy.
Frederick Frevert
Westminster

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