xml:space="preserve">
xml:space="preserve">
Advertisement
Advertisement

Small Business Strategies: Organized effort creates success

As I wrote this week's column, our government was at a standstill for the third consecutive day over multiple issues that neither political party seems intent on remedying.
The lack of progress is causing many concerns, most notably from the Treasury Department, which warned that a deadlock over raising the nation's debt limit could touch off a new recession even worse than the last one.
One of the few, if not only, positives from this fiasco is the valuable lesson it teaches every business owner who desires to create unlimited success and infinite opportunities.
And that lesson is the power and importance of organized effort.
Organized effort is produced through the coordination of effort of two or more people who work toward a definite chief aim or purpose in a spirit of harmonious cooperation. This organized effort creates the power to transform desire into unlimited success.
With organized effort, the entire company works together to attain a common goal or objective. And the most effective tool to create organized effort is through the creation of a mastermind group.
The origin and development of the mastermind concept was popularized in the 1930s by personal success author Napoleon Hill in his discussion with Andrew Carnegie, who commissioned Hill to write a general formula for creating success in business and life. Carnegie was famous for helping to build the American steel industry in the 19th century.
The term "mastermind" is defined as bringing together, in a spirit of perfect harmony, two or more minds. Out of this harmonious unification, the chemistry of the mind creates a third mind which may be used by one or all of the individual minds. This mastermind will remain available as long as the friendly, harmonious alliance between the individual minds exists. It will disappear the instant the alliance is damaged.
During an interview with Hill, Carnegie was asked, "What did you attribute your success?"
His response: "If you wish to know how I got my money I will answer your question by saying we have a master mind here in our business, and that is made up of a score of men who constitute my personal staff of superintendents and managers and accountants and chemists and other necessary types.
"No one person in this group is the master mind, of which I speak. But the total of the minds in the group, coordinated, organized and directed to a definite end, in a spirit of harmonious cooperation is the power that got my money for me."

Recommended on Baltimore Sun

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement