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Dean Minnich: For some, cluelessness pervades

It was funny to hear Evan Feinberg, speaking for Gen Opportunity, advocates for doing away with Obamacare, say, "Why pay for older, sicker, people? Young people know a bad deal when they see it."
Hey, Evan, go look for a clue. Any clue. You won't be 12 forever, Peter Pan.
Local personality and county commissioner Richard Rothschild said something about, "If you want to mine for diamonds, go where the diamonds are." He explained he was talking about impermeable surfaces, and if the state wants to collect "rain taxes" from those whose rooftops and driveways are causing runoff problems, go charge the towns and cities.
Commissioner, see note above to Evan. Clue. Eight incorporated towns in Carroll County are populated by - get this - Carroll County taxpayers. Small towns will be scrabbling around more than big towns to find the money the state wants, and county leaders are making noises like they might let the towns twist in the wind.
The solution to this, from some camps, is to secede from the state, and some of Rothschild's closest friends and staunchest supporters like that idea. Conservative folks in northern Colorado want to create a state of their own, so why not Western Maryland, especially now that the county no longer meets regularly with Baltimore Area Council of Governments.
I guess the local politicians feel less obliged to the 65 percent of the county residents who commute to work in urban areas than they do to fans of TV shows like "Doomsday Preppers" or "Swamp Bubbas."
Which reminds me: Did you see the History Channel piece on the head of the American Nazi Party bragging about how they are growing, and now count among their membership politicians, police officers and judges?
Which reminds me again: Look up the film "Game Change," starring Ed Harris as Sen. John McCain and Julianne Moore as Sarah Palin. It's a docudrama about how McCain's handlers led him down the primrose path to choose a vice presidential running mate that would appeal to (1) the right wing, and (2) females.
The Alaska soccer mom looked good with only five days vetting. All the other suggestions for the job had been studied for five months. Then they found out she did not know where Germany is, and was confused as to why there had to be both a North and a South Korea. This is not a joke.
Palin was so depressed with the reaction to her cluelessness in the lower 48 that she wanted to campaign in Alaska, where she felt more loved. Aides to McCain told him she was having a breakdown.
After a good showing in the debate with Joe Biden, she regained her confidence and rebelled against the McCain team, saying she was bringing in all the money, so she was going to do things her way. She bullied staffers, fired anyone who crossed her and even tried to upstage McCain the night of the concession speech following their failed election campaign. Sounds familiar.
McCain's best moment was included in the film: It was when he took the microphone back from a woman who was accusing Barack Obama of being an illegal immigrant and a Muslim with a radical agenda. This was when he said, and I paraphrase, "No, ma'am, he is not. We have significant differences politically, but Barack Obama is an American," an honorable man.
I believe that McCain sealed his loss right there, because he was doing the right thing, instead of the thing he was advised to do to get votes.
Fairly, the film shows the weaknesses of Obama; more rock star than administrator, more orator than leader. It shows the cynicism and manipulative nature of political campaigns. In a scene that was played out here in local elections, the clueless Palin is being drilled on facts when one political pro says, "Wait: All we need for the debate is 25 two-minute answers, and we can decide what the answer will be no matter what the question."
It's called "the pivot." You've seen it. The moderator asks a question that the candidate never answers. Instead, the politician pivots to a variation of their diatribe against the opposition. It's maddening, but that's how it's done. It's why debates are generally worthless for anything except getting an idea of what the back room handlers are telling their puppets what to say for public consumption.
Rule number one is, never say you can see Russia from Alaska.
I think it was Abraham Lincoln who said it's better to say nothing and let people believe you are ignorant than to speak up and remove all doubt.

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